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Archive: April, 2019

Picasso on the road

April 26th, 2019

A Picasso painting with a small child and woman holding a bowl of soup
Pablo Picasso. La Soupe, 1902. Oil on canvas, Overall: 38.5 x 46 cm. Gift of Margaret Dunlap Crang, 1983. © Picasso Estate / SOCAN (2019)

Do you think a young and relatively unknown Picasso, struggling to pay for food, knew that the canvases he was painting and repainting would become some of the most celebrated works of twentieth-century modern art? Created at the beginning of his career, from 1901–1907, the works of the Blue and Rose periods offer a glimpse of the evolution of a young genius. Many of these masterpieces, including two outstanding works on loan from the AGO Collection, are currently on display at The Fondation Beyeler in Basel, Switzerland, as part of its landmark exhibition, The Young Picasso – Blue and Rose Periods.

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Last chance for Impressionism

April 25th, 2019

A Camille Pissarro painting of a factory in the countryside next to a river
Camille Pissarro. Factory Near Pontoise [Usine Près Pointoise], 1873. Oil on canvas, Unframed: 45.7 × 54.6 cm. Michele and Donald D’Amour Museum of Fine Arts, Springfield, Massachusetts/ The James Philip Gray Collection. Photo: David Stansbury

Have you seen our major exhibition Impressionism in the Age of Industry: Monet, Pissarro and more yet? It’s closing May 5, and trust us: you won’t want to miss the groundbreaking show the Toronto Star called a “phenomenal and enlightening exhibit that promises to change the way people see the Impressionists.”

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Arte Povera: A radical art movement

April 25th, 2019

A white walled gallery with a large sculptural work with burlap sacks a long pole and to steel outlines of Germany with a light at the end.
Luciano Fabro. La Germania, 1984. Steel, various metals, glass, plastic, electrical elements, sandbags, Overall (installed): 285 × 975 × 177 cm, Steel pole approx.weight: 170 lb. Light fixture: 16.3 lb. Combined weight of steel map: 202 lb. Purchase, 1985. 84/943 Courtesy of the Archivio Luciano e Carla Fabro

As you enter Signy Eaton Gallery on Level 2 at the AGO, you’ll see a long iron pole slanting upward from a pile of sandbags. Near the top of the pole, two steel slabs are bolted together with a streetlight shining a spotlight. On the other side of the room, burlap sacks and steel shelves are stacked with pieces of wood and plaster fragments of sculpture. These large sculptural installations are, respectively, La Germania by Luciano Fabro and Untitled by Jannis Kounellis. Together they make up Arte Povera, our latest and last installment of Look:Forward, a display that focuses on the Italian Arte Povera movement.

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A Q&A with Vija Celmins curator Gary Garrels

April 25th, 2019

A detailed black and white drawing of a spiderweb.
Vija Celmins, Untitled (Web #1), 1998. Charcoal on paper, 56.5 x 64.8 cm. Tate Modern, London, acquired jointly with the National Galleries of Scotland through The d’Offay Donation with assistance from the National Heritage Memorial Fund and the Art Fund 2008 © Vija Celmins. Photo courtesy Matthew Marks Gallery

Vija Celmins is renowned for her fascinating and entrancing portrayals of natural imagery, ranging from ocean waves to the sky at night. With its exquisite detail, Celmins’s work encourages viewers to take a moment and look closer to consider the captivating beauty in both her work and the natural world around us. Ten years in the making, Vija Celmins: To Fix the Image in Memory is a comprehensive retrospective of more than five decades of the artist’s paintings, drawings and sculptures, and will open at the AGO on May 4.

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Free wheeling

April 25th, 2019

Photo by Ivona Novak

When Ivona Novak brought her three-year-old son Noah to the AGO for the first time, she wasn’t sure what to expect. Noah has been paralyzed since he was six months old as a result of pediatric cancer, and he and his family have been encountering accessibility challenges on a daily basis ever since.

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All that glitters

April 18th, 2019

Two silhouetted figures in front of an artwork
Party-goers stand in front of an artwork by Alexa DelSol at AGO Massive XV. Image courtesy of the AGO.

The crystal anniversary of AGO Massive brought good vibes to the museum. This important fundraiser celebrated 15 years of supporting the AGO’s mission to bring people together with art to see, experience and understand the world in new ways. And all with a good dose of glitter!

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Celebrate mom at the AGO

April 18th, 2019

Image by the AGO.

It’s that time of year again – when the rush to get the perfect bouquet of flowers, find that special gift or plan an unforgettable outing for mom begins. Well, look no further. We’ve got just what you need. The AGO is a great place to spend Mother’s Day (Sunday, May 12) by strolling around together and taking in the great art on display. And when you’ve worked up an appetite from all that artful fun, join us for a special Mother’s Day Brunch or Afternoon Tea at the Grange.

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Seeing Impressionism in 3D

April 18th, 2019

Man holding a tablet in front of a piece of art. The tablet is showing a 3D version of the scene in the painting.
A visitor using AR to view Impressionism in the Age of Industry, 2019. Work shown: Gustave Caillebotte. Le Pont de l’Europe, 1876. Association des Amis du Petit Palais, Genève.

At first glance Gustave Caillebotte’s Le Pont de l’Europe 1876 (a highlight from our exhibition Impressionism in the Age of Industry: Monet, Pissarro and more) appears to be an everyday urban scene of people strolling across a bridge in 1870s Paris. However, someone standing on this same bridge in 1876 might notice something amiss in the artist’s depiction. Now, thanks to intensive research and innovative technology, visitors to the exhibition can see for themselves just how much artistic license Caillebotte really took.

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Take a closer look at Metamorphosis

April 18th, 2019

A bearskin sewn together into a bag rests atop a rectangular piece of fabric, laying atop a mound of white eggshells.
Tim Whiten. Metamorphosis, 1978-1989. Ritual vessel (completely tanned bearskin, brass bells, cotton ties), grey pillow (cotton with synthetic foam), crushed eggshells, 4 glass votive containers and candles, 4 incense tiles, Installed (completed Ritual installation): 254 × 254 cm (100 × 100 in.) Overall (egg shell Ritual bed): 1.5 × 243.8 cm (9/16 × 96 in.). Purchase with assistance from the Estate of P.J. Glasser, 2016.  ©Tim Whiten

For many, spring is symbolic of reawakening. For artist Tim Whiten, the same can be said with the bearskin pelt used in his work Metamorphosis, on view now at the AGO in the J.S. McLean Centre for Indigenous & Canadian Art.

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HOW TO: painting essentials edition

April 18th, 2019

Painting with watercolours
Image courtesy of the AGO.

Whether it’s a still lake, a reflective pool or a rushing river, it’s easy to be inspired by the ever-changing nature of water. And no matter the level of your artistic skill, picking up the brush to capture the wonder of water can be intimidating. Have no fear, we’re here to help. To you get started, we asked long-time AGO painting instructor and Toronto-based artist Lauren Renzetti to show us how to paint the ocean – in just 60 seconds!

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