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Archive: June, 2018

Dive into Joyce Wieland

June 29th, 2018

Joyce Wieland's Boat Tragedy, a film strip-like painting of a boat sinking

Joyce Wieland, Boat Tragedy, 1964. Oil on canvas, 50.2 x 121.9 cm. Gift from the Toronto Dominion Bank, 1965. © 2018 Art Gallery of Ontario

A pioneering feminist artist and the first living female artist to receive a solo exhibition at the AGO, Joyce Wieland was a prominent and influential figure in the Canadian art scene from the ‘60s to the ‘80s. Last week we caught up with Georgiana Uhlyarik, Fredrik S. Eaton Curator, Canadian Art and Renée van der Avoird, Assistant Curator, Canadian Art, as they were installing three works by Wieland in the newly renamed, revitalized and reopened J. S. McLean Centre for Indigenous & Canadian Art.

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Put your best paws forward

June 29th, 2018

Three dogs playing in Grange Park

Image by the AGO.

Whether you call them dogs, doggies, woofers or your best friend, we love the dogs of Grange Park. And this week we’re honouring our puppy pals to celebrate the one-year anniversary of Grange Park’s revitalization.

The revitalization project brought exciting changes to the Park including 80 new trees, more seating, interactive water features and an expanded children’s play area with fun equipment inspired by artistic creativity and the arts, such as paint palettes, paint cans and crumpled pieces of paper. Henry Moore’s sculpture Large Two Forms, which used to sit at the southwest corner of McCaul and Dundas Streets, was relocated to the Park, where the natural setting allows visitors to view it from all angles without barriers. And then there’s the off-leash dog park where the Park’s aww-dorable fans can brighten even the greyest day. (Find out more about the Park’s community-led revitalization here.)

We can’t think of a better way to celebrate the one-year anniversary of the Park’s reopening than shaking paws with some pups that visit the Park’s popular off-leash area. Say hello to your new best friends:

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AGO Bistro gets Summerlicious!

June 29th, 2018

A trout dish by AGO Bistro available during Summerlicious

Grilled steelhead trout, Image by the AGO.

What better way to celebrate the start of summer than chowing down at the AGO Bistro on a delicious prix-fixe menu that can satisfy both your wallet and your taste buds?

It wouldn’t be a true foodie’s summer without Summerlicious. And for the ninth year in a row, AGO Bistro is participating in Toronto’s most popular annual dining event. You can enjoy three courses of inspired and Instagram-worthy summer fare for just $28 for lunch or $43 for dinner (per person).

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Bringing the North to the AGO

June 29th, 2018

Sculptor and Curator Koomuatuk Curley speaking in front of a Tim Pitsiulak work

Co-curator Koomuatuk Curley inside Tunirrusiangit, Image by the AGO.

Tunirrusiangit: Kenojuak Ashevak and Tim Pitsiulak ­celebrates the artistic legacies of “the grandmother of Inuit art”, Kenojuak Ashevak, and her nephew, Tim Pitsiulak, and the impact of their work on contemporary Inuit culture. The exhibition, which is getting rave reviews, is on now in the Sam & Ayala Zacks Pavilion – the first time Inuit art has been showcased in the museum’s largest gallery space. It’s also the first time an AGO exhibition has been co-curated by four Inuit artists.

Tunirrusiangit co-curator Koomuatuk (Kuzy) Curley helped bring the voices of the artists’ families into the exhibition. Koomuatuk is Tim Pitsiulak’s nephew and he comes from the same area of the North as Pitsiulak and Ashevak, Kinngait (formerly known as Cape Dorset). Koomuatuk is also a celebrated sculptor. Art is in his blood – he’s a third generation carver in his family.

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Meet Mob Bounce

June 29th, 2018

Hip-hop duo Mob Bounce sitting by a stream

Image courtesy of the artists. Photo by Dale Cutler.

Have you booked your tickets? On July 5, the AGO is staying up late to host First Thursday: Resurgent Homelands. Celebrating both the reopening of the newly renovated (and renamed) J. S. McLean Centre of Indigenous & Canadian Art and Tunirrusiangit: Kenojuak Ashevak and Tim Pitsiulak, this edition of the AGO’s monthly art party promises to be a night of Indigenous storytelling, artful conversations and the best of contemporary music.

We’ve already told you about the upcoming performance of storyteller Taqralik Partridge, one of the co-curators of Tunirrusiangit: Kenojuak Ashevak and Tim Pitsiulak. Also on the lineup of stellar artists performing at First Thursday: Resurgent Homelands is northwest coast Indigenous influenced hip-hop duo Mob Bounce, bringing a powerful combination of social justice and electronic beats. As the evening’s headlining act, they’ll take to Walker Court’s stage at 10 p.m. Read the rest of this entry »

Strolling through the galleries

June 25th, 2018

Caregivers and children in the AGO look at a painting

Image by the AGO

Summer is here and the thermometer is rising. Lucky for parents and caregivers, on those days when it’s just too hot to take the kids to Grange Park, it’s only a hop, skip and a jump into the cool oasis of the AGO.

The AGO’s Strolling the Galleries tours offer a cultural experience and air-conditioned respite for infants, toddlers and their parents or caregivers. These relaxed, one-hour thematic tours provide a chance for caregivers of little ones to socialize and learn about art in the AGO Collection. While caregivers or parents make connections between art and their own lives, kids will be mesmerized by the colours and shapes they see all around them.

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A big reveal

June 25th, 2018

A stone carving of human figures by Abraham Anghik Ruben.

Abraham Anghik Ruben. The Hunter and the Seamstress, 2001. Stone, 204.1 kg, 105.4 × 62.2 cm © Abraham Anghik Ruben AGO.119039

Join us on July 1st as we celebrate the re-opening of the J. S. McLean Centre for Indigenous & Canadian Art with music and artful conversation.

The Centre, which closed in March, is now renovated, reinstalled and renamed, as part of our Gallery-wide Look:Forward project. Located on Level 2 of the AGO, it features over 75 works by Indigenous and Canadian artists, including groundbreaking art by contemporary Indigenous artists. The Centre is organized thematically, with spaces devoted to exploring origin stories, issues of land and water, how we construct our sense of self and how artists engage with the spirit. Designed to spark conversations between artists and across time, these thematic groupings live alongside dedicated exhibition spaces for Indigenous artists, as well as a focus gallery where the photographic work of June Clark is now highlighted.

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A night of Indigenous storytelling

June 25th, 2018

Curator and artist Taqralik Partridge shows archival newsprint in the shape of a traditional Inuit qarmaq

Curator and artist Taqralik Partridge shows archival newsprint in the shape of a traditional Inuit qarmaq inside Tunirrusiangit: Kenojuak Ashevak and Tim Pitsiulak. Image by the AGO.

We can’t wait for the July 5th First Thursday: Resurgent Homelands.

This edition of the monthly art party is inspired by Tunirrusiangit: Kenojuak Ashevak and Tim Pitsiulak – the AGO’s retrospective on two formidable Inuit artists seen through the lens of four contemporary Inuit artists and curators. (Don’t miss that exhibition, now on in the Sam & Ayala Zacks Pavilion – the first time Inuit art has been showcased in the museum’s largest gallery space). First Thursday also celebrates the reopening of the newly renovated (and renamed) J. S. McLean Centre of Indigenous & Canadian Art, which will see works by Indigenous, Inuit and Canadian artists put into conversation across time, to better reflect the Nation-to-Nation relationship that Canada was built upon.

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Rediscover wonder

June 25th, 2018

People drawing in front of paintings at the AGO

Image by the AGO

If you’re looking to recapture a sense of awe, one of our newest courses, Art & Ideas: Wonder, might be for you. The innovative course combines philosophical discussion with art-making – all in the name of engaging deeply with art while rediscovering a sense of wonder.

We spoke with instructor and philosopher Dr. Wendy O’Brien to learn more about the links between art and philosophy and why it’s important to cultivate a sense of wonder.

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