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Listen: Brown Bag Lunch & Talk, with John Elderfield

March 17th, 2014

Why Matisse matters – and de Kooning, Bob Dylan and other great moderns

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Recorded: Jan. 17, 2014, in Baillie Court, Art Gallery of Ontario
Duration: 01:06:15

A leading authority on modern art, John Elderfield offers us an in-depth and insightful look at Henri Matisse and his ongoing relevance in contemporary art and culture. Elderfield brings a wealth of knowledge to this talk, as an independent curator and art historian, a consultant to Gagosian Gallery and as chief curator emeritus of Painting and Sculpture at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, where he directed more than 20 exhibitions, including Fauvism and its Affinities (1976), Kurt Schwitters (1985), de Kooning: A Retrospective (2011), and Henri Matisse: A Retrospective (1992).

This one-hour talk included a self-serve brown bag lunch of a sandwich and small pastry, created by the AGO’s culinary team.

The Brown Bag Lunch & Talk series is generously supported by

  • Maxine Granovsky Gluskin & Ira Gluskin

In association with

  • The Drawing Room

This month in Prints and Drawings: Date with Dada

March 11th, 2014

Valentine Hugo (French 1890-1968), Tristan Tzara (Romanian 1896-1963), Yves Tanguy (French 1900-1955), Paul Eluard (French 1895-1952), Nusch Eluard (French 1906-1946).                                                                                                 Cadavre Exquis  c. 1931 crayon on black paper                                                                                                       31.5 x 24.1 cm Purchased as a gift of the Trier-Fodor Foundation with the assistance of a Movable Cultural Property grant accorded by the Department of Canadian Heritage under the terms of the Cultural Property Export and Import Act, 2012 2012/6

Valentine Hugo (French 1890-1968), Tristan Tzara (Romanian 1896-1963), Yves Tanguy (French 1900-1955), Paul Eluard (French 1895-1952), Nusch Eluard (French 1906-1946). Cadavre Exquis, c. 1931, crayon on black paper, 31.5 x 24.1 cm. Purchased as a gift of the Trier-Fodor Foundation with the assistance of a Movable Cultural Property grant accorded by the Department of Canadian Heritage under the terms of the Cultural Property Export and Import Act, 2012.

This March the AGO’s Prints and Drawings department invites you to join them for a Date with Dada, the newest edition of its monthly Date with [Art] series.

Each Wednesday throughout the month, stop by the Marvin Gelber Print & Drawing Study Centre for the Open Door program, running from 1 to 8 p.m. Enjoy tours of the Study Centre and see original works by original works by Dada artists including Jean Arp, Max Ernst and Marcel Duchamp. Before 5 p.m., you can even ask staff members to bring specific works out from storage for viewing.

“Kicking the Traces: Dada 1916-1923” is the title of this month’s Second Friday Talk, happening on March 14 at 11 a.m. (the Study Centre doors open at 10:30 a.m. for viewing works). This is a free talk by one of our wonderful Prints and Drawings volunteers, featuring original works by Dada artists.

Have questions about Prints and Drawings at the AGO? Leave them in the comments below.

Listen: Meet the Artist, with Paul Graham

March 10th, 2014

Paul Graham, Untitled (Smoking girl in orange light)Paul Graham,
Untitled (Smoking girl in orange light), 1996–98, from the series end of an age.
Chromogenic print, 179.5 x 133.7 cm.
Gift of Alison and Alan Schwartz, 2000. 2000/1348 © Paul Graham; courtesy Pace Gallery and Pace/MacGill Gallery, New York.

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Recorded: Oct. 17, 2013, at Jackman Hall, Art Gallery of Ontario
Duration: 1:23:13

Paul Graham is a British photographer based in New York. Lauded as “a profound force for renewal of the deep photographic tradition of engagement with the world,” he was awarded the 2012 Hasselblad award for major achievements in photography.

In conjunction with the exhibition Light My Fire: Some Propositions about Portraits and Photography

Generously supported by Penny Rubinoff

Signature Partner, Photography Collection Program

A hands-on experience with the Thomson Collection

March 4th, 2014

The touchscreen recently installed in the Thomson Collection of European Art (Gallery 107). Photo by Craig Boyko/Art Gallery of Ontario.

The touchscreen recently installed in the Thomson Collection of European Art (Gallery 107). Photo by Craig Boyko/Art Gallery of Ontario.

The Thomson Collection of European Art at the Art Gallery of Ontario includes about 900 objects, mainly northern European sculpture and decorative arts dating from the early Middle Ages to the mid-19th century.

In addition to the collection’s cornerstone artwork, Peter Paul Rubens’ The Massacre of the Innocents, it has both sacred and secular objects including a renowned group of medieval and Baroque ivories, as well as fine examples of silver, Limoges enamel, boxwood carving, medieval manuscripts, carved portrait medallions and nearly 100 portrait miniatures from the 16th to the 19th centuries. It’s a varied collection that captures visitors’ interest, and they’ve told us that they want to know more.

Staff from our Digital Services department worked hard to create a new entry point to the Thomson Collection, in the form of an interactive touchscreen. You’ll find the screen close to the AGO’s entrance (Gallery 107), a room that also contains two paintings (from the Thomson Collection’s Canadian works), a ship model and a vitrine full of small objects from the European Collection.

These objects and paintings represent the Thomson Collection’s European, Canadian and Ship Model components, and each object has a story behind it and reason, including why Ken Thomson collected and appreciated it. In addition to getting an introduction to Thomson and the legacy of his collection, visitors can learn about the objects in depth by selecting them on the touchscreen. They are also directed to other spaces in the Gallery with more of the same kind of object.

Photo by Craig Boyko/Art Gallery of Ontario.

Photo by Craig Boyko/Art Gallery of Ontario.

How’d we do it?

The display screen is Microsoft’s 55-inch Perceptive Pixel touch display (learn more about it here). To get the project up and running, AGO photographers had to re-shoot each item using “focus stacking.” This process extends the depth of field in a shot (making more of it in sharp focus) without losing file data using multiple exposures and post-production software.

A folding knife with boxwood handle from the Thomson Collection of European Art. The image on the right — created using the photo-stacking technique — has an extended depth of field.

A folding knife with boxwood handle from the Thomson Collection of European Art. The image on the right — created using the photo-stacking technique — has an extended depth of field.

A shallow depth of field has always been an issue with macro photography. The objects included in the touchscreen project are almost all very small, so we adopted this photo merging or “stacking” software as a new approach. It allows the viewer to see these detailed objects more clearly than ever before.

What’s next? Our Digital team is full of ideas on how to make the experience even better, including enhanced way-finding and the ability to create personalized tours. We hope you’ll spend a few minutes with the touchscreen on your next visit. And if you’ve already had a chance to try it out, share your thoughts on the experience in the comments below.

Listen: Art & Ideas, A Bird’s Eye View on Art & Extinction

March 3rd, 2014

Sara Angelucci, Aviary (Male Passenger Pigeon/extinct), 2013
Sara Angelucci,
Aviary (Male Passenger Pigeon/extinct),
2013.
© 2013 Sara Angelucci.
Courtesy of the artist.
Sara Angelucci, Aviary (Female Passenger Pigeon/extinct), 2013
Sara Angelucci,
Aviary (Female Passenger Pigeon/extinct),
2013.
© 2013 Sara Angelucci.
Courtesy of the artist.

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Recorded: Jan. 15, 2014, at Jackman Hall, Art Gallery of Ontario
Duration: 01:31:16

Artist-in-residence Sara Angelucci; writer and historian Matthew Brower, Mark Peck, Royal Ontario Museum Ornithology Technician; and Bridget Stutchbury, author and Professor of Ornithology at York University, gathered to discuss the extinction and endangerment of North American birds as well as art and society’s relationship with the natural environment. The talk was moderated by the AGO’s curator of Canadian Art, Andrew Hunter.

Pigeon-less Pie, Sara Angelucci

The discussion was followed by a three-course meal served in FRANK restaurant, specially prepared by executive chef Jeff Dueck in consultation with Sara Angelucci. The main dish featured a vegetarian “pigeon-less” pie to mark the 100th anniversary of the extinction of the passenger pigeon. The passenger pigeon, formerly one of the most abundant birds in North America, was pushed to extinction in 1914 due to habitat destruction and over hunting. Dinner and dessert were each paired with a choice of white or red Ontario wine.

 

Speaker Bios

Sara Angelucci is a Toronto-based visual artist who works primarily with photography, video and audio, exploring vernacular archival materials such as home movies, snap-shots and vintage portraits and their limited ability to convey the exact sense of a lived experience. Working with these images Angelucci seeks to reposition them in the present, shedding light on their broader context and histories outside of the frame.

Matthew Brower is a lecturer in Museum Studies in the Faculty of Information at the University of Toronto. He writes on issues in animal studies, the history and theory of photography and contemporary art. He is the Author of Developing Animals: Wildlife and Early American Photography (University of Minnesota Press 2010). He has curated exhibitions in historical and contemporary art including Mieke Bal: Nothing is Missing, Gord Peteran: Recent Works, The Brothel Without Walls, Suzy Lake: Political Poetics, and Collective Identity │Occupied Spaces.

Mark Peck is the Collection Manager in Ornithology, Department of Natural History, Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) in Toronto. He is also involved in museum exhibits and programs and field research in South America, New Jersey and the Hudson Bay Lowlands of northern Ontario. In addition, he is the coordinator of the Ontario Nest Records Scheme, the ROM liaison for the Ontario Bird Records Committee and the program director for the Toronto Ornithological Club. In his off hours he is an avid bird photographer, traveling extensively for both his profession and his hobby. He has authored or coauthored numerous scientific and popular articles on birds and hundreds of his images have been published in books, magazines and on websites. Mark has been with the ROM since 1983.

Bridget Stutchbury is a professor in the Department of Biology at York University, Toronto. She completed her M.Sc. at Queen’s University and her PhD at Yale and was a postdoctoral fellow at the Smithsonian Institution. Since the 1980s, she has studied migratory songbirds to understand their behaviour, ecology and conservation. Her current research focuses on studying the incredible migration journeys of songbirds to help halt the severe declines in many species. She serves on the board of Wildlife Preservation Canada and is the author of Silence of the Songbirds (2007) and The Bird Detective (2010).

Remembering Sorel Etrog

February 27th, 2014

Courtesy of Eva Varga.

Courtesy of Eva Varga.

In 2013, the Art Gallery of Ontario proudly presented a career-spanning exhibition of artist Sorel Etrog’s work, featuring his archetypal sculptures and his rarely seen film, Spiral, plus drawings, paintings, book illustrations and prints from both the Gallery’s and private collections. Born in Romania, Etrog came to Toronto in 1963 and his career here left an undeniable mark, both on our cityscape and the many people in Toronto’s art community who knew and admired him.

Below AGO CEO and director Matthew Teitelbaum reflects on Etrog’s passing: Read the rest of this entry »

Listen: Meet the Artists, with Sara Angelucci, Spring Hurlbut & Marla Hlady

February 24th, 2014

Spring Hurlbut, Peewee #3 (crown)

Spring Hurlbut,

Peewee #3 (crown),

28 1/2 x 32 1/2 inches,

ultrachrome digital print,

edition of 7

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Recorded: Jan. 8, 2014, at Jackman Hall, Art Gallery of Ontario
Duration: 1:13:47

This talk features former artist-in-residence Sara Angelucci in conversation with artists Spring Hurlbut and Marla Hlady about their work, points of convergence and departure.

Sara Angelucci (born Hamilton, Ont.) is a Toronto-based visual artist who works primarily with photography, video and audio, exploring vernacular archival materials such as home movies, snap-shots and vintage portraits and their limited ability to convey the exact sense of a lived experience. Working with these images Angelucci seeks to reposition them in the present, shedding light on their broader context and histories outside of the frame.

Spring Hurlbut (born Toronto, Ont.) is a Toronto-based artist whose installations, sculptures and photography explore life, death and the human condition. Hurlbut, through her sculptures, which incorporate bone, egg shells, and claws, her photographs of human ash and her solemn monochrome portraits, encourages the acceptance of one’s own mortality and attempts to find the beauty in this inevitability.

Marla Hlady (born Edmonton, Alta.) lives and works in Toronto as a sound and kinetic sculpture artist, exploring ways of experiencing sound through spatial and social contexts. Hlady’s pieces deal with the nature of sound, often materializing it for viewers and reorienting their connection to everyday auditory experiences.

This month in Prints & Drawings: Date with Henri Matisse

February 13th, 2014

Henri Matisse, Le Coeur, c. 1947, stencil print on paper. Gift of Mr. Arthur Gelber, 1986. 86/129.  © Estate of H. Matisse / SODRAC (2014).

Henri Matisse, Le Coeur, c. 1947, stencil print on paper. Gift of Mr. Arthur Gelber, 1986. 86/129.
© Estate of H. Matisse / SODRAC (2014).

This February our Prints & Drawings department invites you to join them for a Date with Henri Matisse, the newest edition of its monthly Date with [Art] series.

Each Wednesday throughout the month, stop by the Marvin Gelber Print & Drawing Study Centre for the Open Door program, running from 1 to 8 p.m. Enjoy tours of the Study Centre and see original works by Henri Matisse. Before 5 p.m., you can even ask staff members to bring specific works out from storage for viewing.

Henri Matisse is also the title of this month’s Second Friday Talk, happening on Feb. 14 at 11 a.m. (the Study Centre doors open at 10:30 a.m. for viewing works). This is a free talk by one of our wonderful Prints and Drawings volunteers, featuring original works by Henri Matisse.

Have questions about Prints and Drawings at the AGO? Leave them in the comments below.

Kids take over for Family Day 2014!

February 11th, 2014

This Family Day, let your kids be part of something BIG! On Feb. 17, the AGO will transform into the KGO – the Kids’ Gallery of Ontario. Kids will take over the Gallery and let their creativity soar in this all-day art extravaganza.

Family Day at the AGO in 2013

Family Day at the AGO in 2013

Why choose KGO?

Discounted admission on a Family Day Pass includes all of the fun spread throughout the Gallery – from giant board games to an all-day dance party, to art-making in our studio!

Active fun includes dancing, a Gallery-wide game of Clue, virtual reality art-hunt challenges (via the Time Tremors AGO app), guided tours for kids and families, a Build-It-Take-It-Apart Room, and a giant build-it-yourself playground.

Kids and their adults can make their own original artworks in the Dr. Anne Tanenbaum Gallery School – an all-day art party designed to inspire creative minds to make amazing things. The Dr. Mariano Hands-On Centre hosts our youngest visitors (ages 5 and under), and includes games, play, art-making and stories.

Want to just hang out? Families can chill out in a yoga class, grab a tasty treat from our café and even take a memento home from our fantastic kids’ shop.

See art in new ways in our newest exhibition, Just Like Me: Explore, Imagine, Create. This exhibition is housed in the newly created Kids’ Gallery, and includes exciting works all about children from the AGO’s collections, a unique drawing and activity area, and a photo booth where you can become a work of art! On Instagram, use the hashtag #agokidsgallery and watch your portrait become part of the exhibition (and this popular Facebook album).

Did you know that kids 5 and under eat free at cafeAGO? Accompanied by an adult who’s spending $12 or more, get two free kids’ meals for free. Here are more details.

And getting here is easy! Access the KGO in the heart of downtown Toronto by transit or by car, or make a day of it and explore our neighbourhood — including nearby Chinatown, Kensington Market and Queen Street West — on foot!

The AGO's Gallery School during Family Day 2013.

The AGO’s Gallery School during Family Day 2013.

Family Day Hours

Monday, Feb. 17
Gallery hours: 10 am – 4 pm
Hands-On Centre: 10 am – 4 pm
FRANK Restaurant: 11 am – 3 pm
caféAGO: 10 am – 3:30 pm
Espresso Bar: 10 am – 3:30 pm
Members’ Lounge: 11 am – 3:30 pm
shopAGO & shopAGOkids: 10 am – 4 pm

On the agenda…

WALKER COURT

  • Giant floor games and all-day dance party (11 a.m., 1 p.m. and 3 p.m.)
  • Starting point for a Gallery-wide game of Clue

EXHIBITION

  • Visit the brand new Kids’ Gallery Just Like Me exhibition
  • Family-friendly films in Jackman Hall

WESTON FAMILY LEARNING CENTRE

  • Art-making activites
  • Meeting point for KGO Gallery tours
  • Built It and Take It Apart Room
  • Family yoga (11 a.m. and 1 p.m.)
  • Drop-in playtime for little ones in the Dr. Mariano Elia Hands-On Centre

Don’t forget: Save $10 on the AGO Family Pass. For $39 a Family Pass admits two adults and up to five youths (ages 6 to 17). Children 5 and under are FREE.

Come out and play: Torontrons land in the AGO Community Gallery

February 4th, 2014

arcade gallery

AGO artist-in-residence Jim Munroe has transformed the Community Gallery into a classic arcade with a pop-up installation of three retrofitted arcade cabinets called Torontrons. Engineered by The Hand Eye Society and produced by Munroe, each Torontron is loaded with six contemporary video games designed by Toronto video-game artists. The pop-up arcade cabinets have appeared all over Winnipeg and in Toronto — recently at Academy of the Impossible, the TIFF Bell Lightbox, Roy Thompson Hall and the Projection Booth Cinema — and have inspired similar international projects in New York, Shanghai, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Australia and beyond.

Image courtesy of Jim Munroe/The Hand Eye Society.

Image courtesy of Jim Munroe/The Hand Eye Society.

From Feb. 1 to March 21, 2014, visit the Community Gallery on our concourse level to play – no quarters required! And before you visit, preview some of the Torontron games online:

Want to know more? In late January, Munroe spoke about his residency on CBC Radio’s Metro Morning (listen here), and he will also give a pop-up talk at our February edition of First Thursdays. On Feb. 21, Munroe will host Fancy Videogame Party in collaboration with Wild Rumpus and the Hand Eye Society, bringing together some of the best multi-player, party and physical video games from around the world for one night only at the AGO. And you can see him at our Meet the Artists talk in March, when he’ll be in conversation with fellow indie culture artists Mark Connery and Jonathan Mak about their work, indie culture and how playfulness factors into their practices.