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Keep On Tutting

March 5th, 2010

Tutting at the AGO

Tutting at the AGO
Tutting at the AGO

Early last Sunday morning, February 28, more than 100 eager "Tutters" came to the AGO to try setting a new Guinness World Record for the most people Tutting continuously for five minutes.

Professional dance artist Mark Cabuena from the Toronto dance crews Grand Illusion and For the Funk of It led 107 participants of all ages in a choreographed routine. All participants received a free ticket to the AGO and to see the King Tut exhibition. They were also entered in a draw to win a King Tut weekend in Toronto! Karen C. from Toronto was the lucky winner of a night for two at the Westin Harbour Castle, two VIP tickets to see King Tut, and $500 in shopping certificates courtesy of Scarborough Town Centre.

"The success of this event was measured by the overwhelming support of the hip hop community and their enthusiastic response," said Sue Boyle, coordinator, promotions and tourism, and organizer of the event. "It was a huge hit and one step closer to creating a positive relationship with a new audience."

Over 13,600 people have watched our Tutting video on YouTube, and the AGO has received numerous emails from local youth voicing their positive response to this initiative.

We are waiting to see if we set a record. Stay tuned and keep Tutting.

We Want You to Tut and Help Break a World Record!

January 15th, 2010

Join us on Feb. 28, 2010 as we try to set a new Guinness World Record for the most people “Tutting” at one time.

Professional dance artist Mark Cabuena from the Toronto dance crews “Grand Illusion” and “For the Funk of It” has choreographed a simple “Tutting” routine that you will learn, practice and perform on the day of the event. Not only will you impress friends and family, you can help us set the Guniness World Record for the most people dancing simultaneously by “Tutting” continuously for five minutes!

But that’s not all!

Everyone who participates in the event will receive 1 free general admission to the Art Gallery of Ontario and be entered into a contest to win a King Tut weekend in Toronto! One lucky winner will receive one night accommodations for two at the Westin Harbour Castle, two VIP tickets to see King Tut, and $500 in shopping certificates courtesy of Scarborough Town Centre!

Also the first 100 adults and first 100 youth to complete the registration process will receive 1 free ticket to see King Tut: The Golden King and the Great Pharaohs (Please note this exhibition is time ticketed and therefore is subject to availability. Tickets valid until April 18, 2010.).

Register Now

To take part in this event begin the registration process by clicking here.


Contest Partners

Westin Harbour Castle
Scarborough Town Centre

How To Tut

November 13th, 2009

The exhibition King Tut: The Golden King and the Great Pharaohs (showing at the AGO November 24, 2009-April 18, 2010) makes us want to get up and dance. But not just any dance…we want to Tut! And we want you to join us!

Professional dance artist Mark Cabuena from the Toronto dance crews “Grand Illusion” and “For the Funk of It” has choreographed a special “Tutting” routine that is easy and fun to learn! Watch the video above and practice the moves. You can use your new Tutting skills to impress family and friends… and you can help us set a world record! The AGO will be hosting a special Tutting Day in the New Year, where we invite everyone to perform Mark’s Tut routine with us and help us set a world record.

Stay tuned to the website for more information of this amazing and fun event happening at the AGO! Confirmed information (including registration) regarding the “Tutting” event on Sunday Feb. 28, 2010 will be posted on this website the first week of Jan. In the meantime, keep practicing.

More about the History of Tutting.

What is “Tutting”?

August 24th, 2009

According to Wikipedia:

‘Tutting’ refers to a distinct style gained usage during the early 1980s. Its movements made use of the wrists, elbows, and shoulders to create the desired right angle.

Presumably, the dance began as a mimicking of the angular poses common to ancient Egyptian art. Tutting as a whole or certain tutting moves have been referred to as ‘King Tut'; it is likely from this colloquialism for the Pharaoh Tutankhamen, as a representative of ancient Egypt in western popular culture, that the form gained its name.