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Reflections on Spiegelman: Michael Deforge

January 26th, 2015

Art Spiegelman’s work has had a profound impact on artists around the world. We asked Canadian cartoonists, graphic novelists and comics experts how Spiegelman has influenced their own work and the creation and dissemination of comics and graphic novels.

MichaelDeForge

Art Spiegelman pushed the edges of what the medium could be, both in the formal experiments in his own comics and in his work as an editor. In Raw especially, Françoise Mouly and Spiegelman provoked such wild and ambitious contributions from their artists. I wish I was reading comics at a time when books like that were dropping on everyone’s heads on a regular basis. It’s hard to think of many editors taking comparable risks anymore.”
—Toronto-based comic artist Michael DeForge

See DeForge’s recent work here, and follow him on Twitter.


Art Spiegelman’s CO-MIX: A Retrospective runs to March 15, 2015.


Jeet Heer on Spiegelman, Mouly, Crumb, Charlie Hebdo and the underground tradition

January 19th, 2015

With the presentation of Art Spiegelman’s CO-MIX: A Retrospective at the AGO, we’re aiming to highlight not just the significance of Spiegelman’s career, but also growing importance of comics as a defining cultural form in Toronto. Leading up to and during the exhibition’s run ― Dec. 20, 2014, to March 15, 2015 ― we’re using ArtMatters.ca to share voices from the comics scene in Toronto and beyond, as they discuss Spiegelman’s influence and the connections between his work and a wide variety of genres and art forms. Below, Canadian journalist/historian and Twitter essayist Jeet Heer shares his and Spiegelman’s thoughts on criticism and censorship in relation to the recent tragic events in Paris, arguing that “bad speech has to be answered by more speech.” Read the rest of this entry »

A fond farewell to Alex Colville, and thanks to our visitors

January 16th, 2015

Alex Colville Living  Room, 1999-2000, acrylic on Masonite. 41.8 x 58.5 cm. Purchased 2000. National Gallery of Canada (no. 40408). © A.C.Fine Art Inc

Alex Colville Living Room, 1999-2000, acrylic on Masonite.
41.8 x 58.5 cm. Purchased 2000. National Gallery of Canada (no. 40408). © A.C.Fine Art Inc

When Alex Colville closed on Jan. 4, it had attracted 166,406 visitors, making it the 10th–best attended exhibition in our history. Notably, it is the only exhibition in the top 10 that focused on Canadian art. The Gallery’s last Colville exhibition, which ran from July 22 to September 18, 1983, welcomed 49,984 visitors.

What made this presentation different? Our director and CEO, Matthew Teitelbaum, ascribes the recent exhibition’s success to timing and the universality of Colville’s work: “At the moment of Alex Colville’s passing there was an acknowledgement of what he meant to so many people around the country. He was understood as a truly national figure in a new way. When we made the decision to mount the exhibition, we had confidence that people would respond, because Colville’s story is everybody’s story, which is: there is mystery in life. Life is born of relationships and of the place where you are from, and Colville’s work captures that complex sense of place that lies deep in our psyche.” Read the rest of this entry »

Reflections on Spiegelman: Seth

January 13th, 2015

Art Spiegelman’s work has had a profound impact on artists around the world. We asked Canadian cartoonists, graphic novelists and comics experts how Spiegelman has influenced their own work and the creation and dissemination of comics and graphic novels.

Seth. Image courtesy of the artist.

Seth. Image courtesy of the artist.


Art Spiegelman’s great contribution to the medium of comics was to prove that comics could be ‘real’ art. Before him, it was a debatable notion. After Maus, it was an undeniable fact. I’ve learned more from Spiegelman’s work than can be boiled down into a few sentences or paragraphs, but I think the essential thing I gleaned from Art was ambition. He aims high and ponders deeply on how to fulfill those ambitions. I aimed higher myself after reading his work and I discovered that good work only comes from hard work.

—Guelph, Ont.–based cartoonist Seth


Art Spiegelman’s CO-MIX: A Retrospective runs to March 15, 2015.


Jeet Heer on Art Spiegelman and “parody/pastiche as the beginning of creativity”

January 2nd, 2015

With the presentation of Art Spiegelman’s CO-MIX: A Retrospective at the AGO, we’re aiming to highlight not just the significance of Spiegelman’s career, but also growing importance of comics as a defining cultural form in Toronto. Leading up to and during the exhibition’s run ― Dec. 20, 2014, to March 15, 2015 ― we’re using ArtMatters.ca to share voices from the comics scene in Toronto and beyond, as they discuss Spiegelman’s influence and the connections between his work and a wide variety of genres and art forms. Below, Canadian journalist/historian and Twitter essayist Jeet Heer Art discusses Spiegelman’s work in relation to parody and suggests “a silly putty mind is conducive to creativity.” Read the rest of this entry »

Jeet Heer on Art Spiegelman and how avant-garde work reshapes popular culture

December 29th, 2014

With the presentation of Art Spiegelman’s CO-MIX: A Retrospective at the AGO, we’re aiming to highlight not just the significance of Spiegelman’s career, but also growing importance of comics as a defining cultural form in Toronto. Leading up to and during the exhibition’s run ― Dec. 20, 2014, to March 15, 2015 ― we’re using ArtMatters.ca to share voices from the comics scene in Toronto and beyond, as they discuss Spiegelman’s influence and the connections between his work and a wide variety of genres and art forms. Below, Canadian journalist/historian and Twitter essayist Jeet Heer Art discusses Spiegelman’s work and the relationship between avant-garde and mass culture. Read the rest of this entry »

Jeet Heer on Art Spiegelman, Maus and detective fiction

December 10th, 2014

With the presentation of Art Spiegelman’s CO-MIX: A Retrospective at the AGO, we’re aiming to highlight not just the significance of Spiegelman’s career, but also growing importance of comics as a defining cultural form in Toronto. Leading up to and during the exhibition’s run ― Dec. 20, 2014, to March 15, 2015 ― we’re using ArtMatters.ca to share voices from the comics scene in Toronto and beyond, as they discuss Spiegelman’s influence and the connections between his work and a wide variety of genres and art forms. Below, Canadian journalist/historian and Twitter essayist Jeet Heer discusses Spiegelman’s seminal work Maus in relation to the structures and tropes of detective fiction. Read the rest of this entry »

Larger than life: Michelangelo on the big screen

November 28th, 2014

Centuries later, with help from LG Canada, the Renaissance master’s drawings come alive at the AGO

Many of Michelangelo’s works were drawn on small tablets or scrolls, which makes it difficult for the human eye to fully appreciate his attention to detail and inexhaustible creativity. LG’s digital screens and content specially developed for the exhibition magnify five of these works through a video wall, offering visitors an immersive and interactive experience. In total, Michelangelo: Quest for Genius integrates 10 LG 4K and OLED panels, in addition to five LG tablets all helping to illustrate and extend the exhibition’s stories. In the video above, AGO interpretive planner David Wistow explains the value of bringing centuries-old art and cutting edge technology together in Quest for Genius.

Michelangelo: Quest for Genius runs now through Jan. 11, 2015. Search #MichelangeloAGO and #LGatAGO on Twitter to see more visitor comments about the exhibition, and visit michelangeloago.com for a deeper look at the art and themes.

Choose your own Michelangelo adventure at the @agotoronto. #LGatAGO

A photo posted by Matthew Biehl (@matthewbiehl24) on

Artist’s statement: Christi Belcourt on The Wisdom of the Universe

August 7th, 2014

Christi Belcourt, The  Wisdom of the Universe, 2014, acrylic on canvas, 171 × 282 cm, purchased with funds donated by Greg Latremoille, 2014 ©  2014 Christi Belcourt.

Christi Belcourt, The Wisdom of the Universe, 2014, acrylic on canvas, 171 × 282 cm, purchased with funds donated by Greg Latremoille, 2014 © 2014 Christi Belcourt.

The AGO has commissioned and acquired an extraordinary painting entitled The Wisdom of the Universe by Christi Belcourt, a Métis visual artist and author who received the 2014 Ontario Arts Council Aboriginal Arts Award at a ceremony held here on July 30, 2014. Below, Belcourt discusses the ecological concerns that inspired the work.

In Ontario, over 200 species of plants and animals are listed as threatened, endangered or extinct. Of those, included in this painting are the Dwarf Lake Iris, the Eastern Prairie Fringed Orchid, the Karner Blue butterfly, the West Virginia White butterfly, the Spring Blue-eyed Mary, the Cerulean Warbler and Acadian Flycatcher.

Globally, we live in a time of great upheaval. The state of the world is in crisis. We are witness to the unbearable suffering of species, including humans. Much of this we do to ourselves. It is possible for the planet to return to a state of well-being, but it requires a radical change in our thinking. It requires a willingness to be open to the idea that perhaps human beings have got it all wrong.

All species, the lands, the waters are one beating organism that pulses like a heart. We are all a part of a whole. The animals and plants, lands and waters, are our relatives each with as much right to exist as we have. When we see ourselves as separate from each other and think of other species, the waters and the planet itself as objects that can be owned, dominated or subjugated, we lose connection with our humanity and we create imbalance on the earth. This is what we are witnessing around us.

The planet already contains all the wisdom of the universe, as do you and I. It has the ability to recover built into its DNA and we have the ability to change what we are doing so this can happen.

Perhaps it’s time to place the rights of Mother Earth ahead of the rights to Mother Earth.

– Christi Belcourt


This work is one of two paintings by Belcourt currently on display in the Gallery. In the video below, Belcourt discusses the other, entitled So Much Depends Upon Who Holds the Shovel (2008), which appears in our exhibition Before and after the Horizon: Anishinaabe Artists of the Great Lakes.

Listen: Jim Munroe, Mark Connery and Jonathan Mak talk video games and comics

June 4th, 2014

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Recorded: March 26, 2014, at the Art Gallery of Ontario
Duration: 01:29:05

In this podcast, hear AGO artist-in-residence Jim Munroe in conversation with artists Mark Connery, a Toronto-based comic and zine artist, and Jonathan Mak, a Toronto-based game developer, about their work, indie culture and how playfulness factors into their practices. Read the rest of this entry »