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Archive: January, 2018

The TTC is going dotty!

January 15th, 2018

Image by the AGO.

It’s just over a month away but we couldn’t be more excited to bring Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirrors to Toronto. To help build excitement, get ready for a more artistic commute!

The AGO recently partnered with the TTC to celebrate the upcoming exhibition and cover TTC stations and streetcars in Kusama-inspired signature polka dots. Our Marketing team worked with Kusama’s studio to design the polka dot installations, on display in the Spadina and St. Patrick subway stations and on two new streetcars. Read the rest of this entry »

The Shop Girl is back in town

January 15th, 2018

James Tissot. La Demoiselle de magasin, c. 1883-1885. Oil on canvas, 146.1 x 101.6 cm. Gift from Corporations’ Subscription Fund, 1968. Image © 2017 Art Gallery of Ontario.

To cap off an exciting 2017, we looked back at some of the highlights of the European reinstallation on Level 1 of the AGO as part of Look:Forward. Another painting that recently returned to the European gallery walls is French Impressionist painter James Tissot’s charming The Shop Girl (1883–1885) – now on view for the first time in five years. Read the rest of this entry »

We heart art carts

January 15th, 2018

Image by the AGO.

Sometimes it’s not enough to see great art with your eyes – you want to make it with your hands. We know the feeling well, especially when it comes to the mini-Matisse or pint-sized Pitsiulak in your life. The next time you’re at the AGO on a Saturday or Holiday Monday, look for our new Art Cart family activity centres that move to different galleries every month. In January, the Art Carts can be found in Margaret Eaton Gallery on Level 1 and by the South Entrance alongside our Library & Archives on the Concourse Level. Read the rest of this entry »

Dial “M” for Muybridge

January 8th, 2018

Eadweard Muybridge, Plate 616: Animal Locomotion, 1887. Collotype, Image: 22.5 × 33.3 cm, Malcolmson Collection. Gift of Harry and Ann Malcolmson in partnership with a private donor, 2014. Image © Art Gallery of Ontario.

The late 1800s was a period of major innovation in photography, and Eadweard Muybridge was a pioneer of the time with his revealing photographs capturing humans and animals in motion. But if you were alive in the 1870s, or you’re an art history gossip hound, you’d know him for more scandalous reasons.

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This summer: two extraordinary Inuit artists, one incredible exhibition

January 8th, 2018

Kenojuak Ashevak. Large Bird from the Sun, 1979. Stonecut and stencil, 62.5 x 83.1 cm. Gift of Samuel and Esther Sarick, Toronto, 2002.  © Estate of Kenojuak Ashevak.

We’re celebrating the power of Inuit art by bringing together two extraordinary artists – Kenojuak Ashevak and her nephew Timootee (Tim) Pitsiulak – for this summer’s major exhibition Tunirrusiangit: Kenojuak Ashevak and Tim Pitsiulak. Ashevak and Pitsiulak represent two generations of Inuit artists who have challenged us to respond to their art and the Inuit world view in new ways. Running from June 16 to August 12, the exhibition will be the first time Inuit art is showcased in the AGO’s largest exhibition space, the Sam & Ayala Zacks Pavilion, and will be Pitsiulak’s first major gallery retrospective.

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Art for the young (and young at heart)

January 8th, 2018

Image by the AGO.

When residents of Castleview Wychwood Towers in Toronto sat down with a team of Youth Art Ambassadors for an artmaking experience, they weren’t sure what to expect. It didn’t seem like much –some calligraphy ink, yarn and markers. But connections made on both sides of the age divide were transformative. Welcome to the AGO’s Youth Art Ambassador Program.

Under the AGO’s Access to Art initiative, we recently teamed up with the City of Toronto Long-Term Care Homes & Services for a three-year pilot program, supported by The Elia Family. Part of this pilot, the Youth Art Ambassador Program, trains youth volunteers age 14–25 to become Art Ambassadors, so they can lead artmaking experiences for residents and clients of long-term care homes and supportive housing sites. Read the rest of this entry »