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Toronto, take two

February 7th, 2017

The AGO’s Toronto: Tributes + Tributaries exhibition has been infused with newly-installed art for a fresh glimpse into the ‘70s and ‘80s.

FASTWURMS. Wall of Fatigue [from the installation “Snow-She-Bones” at the Ydessa Gallery in 1983], 1983. Industrial galvanized metal panels, four pulleys, four burlap sacks full of potatoes, variable dimensions. FASTWURMS. © FASTWURMS 2017.

Praised by The Globe and Mail for unearthing “a vibrant, political and occasionally messy era of the city’s art history” since its debut last September, Toronto: Tributes + Tributaries, 1971–1989 has intrigued visitors with its wide-ranging look at the generation of Toronto artists who came of age during those tumultuous two decades. Punctuated by references to the city we love and its urban landscape, the exhibition highlights the era’s preoccupation with ideas of performance, the body, the image, self portraiture, storytelling and representation. Intended as an evolving exhibition, Toronto: Tributes + Tributaries is one of the longest-running and most diverse AGO shows in recent history, and this month visitors can see even more Toronto artists as our staff members put the finishing touches on the second half of the installation.

Curated by Wanda Nanibush, the AGO’s Assistant Curator of Canadian and Indigenous Art, the decision to rotate works in the show midway through its run stems from Nanibush’s desire to “do an exhibition of mainly collection works that would constantly change and birth new avenues of connection. A city is a constantly shifting place and the slowness and speed of its transformations affect how we live in it or walk through it. This exhibition is unique in trying to mimic that aspect of city life.”

Between now and February 8, over 40 artworks that have been on display since September will come down to make way for 18 new works.

“Among the newcomers,” says Nanibush, “are some large-scale installation pieces by Vera Frenkel and FASTWÜRMS, alongside multimedia works by Jayce Salloum, and Lisa Steele and Kim Tomczak. These works bring us into the present by highlighting the fact that the majority of the artists in this exhibition are still making work today.”

New additions to the exhibition include:

Colette Whiten. Colette, 1978. Plaster, burlap, plywood, pine, mixed fibres, mixed hardware, 74.8 x 34 x 254 cm. Gift of the artist, 1999. © Colette Whiten 2017.

 

Jayce Salloum. The Ascent of Man /Acts of Consumption, 1985–1987. Videotape, slide-dissolve programs, gallery/lobby & wall pieces, and a bookwork, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist. © Jayce Salloum 2017.

 

Andy Patton. The Statues, 1983. Oil on canvas, 152.6 x 244 cm. Purchase, 1984. © Andy Patton 2017.

 

FASTWURMS. Wall of Fatigue [from the installation “Snow-She-Bones” at the Ydessa Gallery in 1983], 1983. Industrial galvanized metal panels, four pulleys, four burlap sacks full of potatoes, variable dimensions. FASTWURMS. © FASTWURMS 2017.

To find out more about the exhibition and this unique moment in Toronto art history, be sure to join us on February 8 for a free talk in Baillie Court, featuring curator Wanda Nanibush in conversation with artists FASTWÜRMS, Duke Redbird, Ato Seitu, Vera Frenkel, Lisa Steele and Kim Tomczak. This talk is free, but tickets must be reserved in advance. Visit here for more information.

As always, AGO Members see this exhibition for free! Visit here for more information.

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We acknowledge the support of the Canada Council for the Arts, which last year invested $153 million to bring the arts to Canadians throughout the country.

Nous remercions le Conseil des arts du Canada de son soutien. L’an dernier, le Conseil a investi 153 millions de dollars pour mettre de l’art dans la vie des Canadiennes et des Canadiens de tout le pays.

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