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#DrawingAGO Twitter chat with Margaret Priest

February 17th, 2016

Margaret Priest

Margaret Priest

We want to hear from you! Join us on Friday, February 19 at 6pm for our livestream and livetweet of the sold-out talk “Close Encounters: Margaret Priest.”

Re-watch the livestream of the talk below:


To celebrate Drawing, Je t’aime, renowned academic and artist Margaret Priest will be giving an intimate lecture in the Marvin Gelber Print & Drawing Study Centre on the artists whose work has informed and inspired her own practice — and we want you to tweet your questions for Margaret for the Q&A.

 

Egon Schiele, Portrait of a Girl, 1917, black crayon on wove paper, 33.5 x 16.5 cm. Art Gallery of Ontario, Gift of Herbert Alpert in memory of Patricia Joy Alpert, Beloved Wife, Mother, Grandmother, Artist, Educator, 2002

Egon Schiele, Portrait of a Girl, 1917, black crayon on wove paper, 33.5 x 16.5 cm. Art Gallery of Ontario, Gift of Herbert Alpert in memory of Patricia Joy Alpert, Beloved Wife, Mother, Grandmother, Artist, Educator, 2002

HOW TO TAKE PART

Watch the livestream (link below) on Friday, February 19, 6pm – 7:30pm EST.

Follow @agotoronto and the hashtag #DrawingAGO on Twitter for our livetweet of key remarks.

Tweet your questions at any time to @agotoronto (adding the hashtag #DrawingAGO) and we’ll share as many as we can with Margaret.

OR 

Post your questions in the Livestream chat feed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Christiane Pflug, On McDermott's Farm: The Forest, date unknown, graphite on paper, 32 x 24.5 cm . Art Gallery of Ontario, Gift of Dr. Michael Pflug, 1975, Donated by the Ontario Heritage Foundation, 1988

Christiane Pflug, On McDermott’s Farm: The Forest, date unknown, graphite on paper, 32 x 24.5 cm . Art Gallery of Ontario, Gift of Dr. Michael Pflug, 1975, Donated by the Ontario Heritage Foundation, 1988

ABOUT THE TALK

Drawing is a fundamentally philosophical act, an act of faith and a belief in magic. The moment the artist’s first mark literally and metaphorically punctures the surface of a blank sheet of paper – it both affirms and denies that surface – and in so doing, it positions itself at the centre of our consciousness. —Margaret Priest

Through pencil dots, conté dashes, charcoal stumpings, wash scumbles, ink glyphs, hatchings, scratchings and erasures, Margaret Priest invites you to examine the rich materiality and the implied metaphysics found in a group of AGO drawings by artists whose work has informed and inspired her own artistic practice.

Margaret Priest (b.1944 – Tyringham, England) was raised and educated in London, where she received her MFA from the Royal College of Art. She moved to Toronto, Canada in 1976. Known for her drawings and three-dimensional critiques of modernism and the built world, Priest works at the intersections of architecture, design, urban histories and personal memory. Since 1970, she has exhibited in museums and public and private galleries in England, Europe, Canada, Australia, South Africa, and the USA. Though retired from teaching, she is Professor Emeritus at the University of Guelph and a visiting lecturer at universities and schools of art and architecture in Canada and the USA.