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#NewLookAGO Twitter Q&A with curator Kenneth Brummel

February 2nd, 2016

Watch the livestream of the talk at 7pm:

We want to hear from you! Join us on Wednesday, February 3 at 7pm for our livestream and livetweet about Jackson Pollock and the generation of artists who came after him.

Kenneth Brummel, Assistant Curator of Modern Art and curator of A New Look: 1960s and ’70s Abstract Painting at the AGOwill be giving a talk on “After Abstract Expressionism: Making Sense of Painting in the 1960s.” We’ll be livestreaming and livetweeting his talk, and we want you to tweet your questions for Kenneth for the Q&A!

Morris Louis, Delta Tau, 1960, aAcrylic resin on canvas, 274.3 x 457.2 cm (108 x 180 in.). Art Gallery of Ontario, gift of the Estate of Marcella Brenner Louis, 2010.

Morris Louis, Delta Tau, 1960, acrylic resin on canvas, 274.3 x 457.2 cm (108 x 180 in.). Art Gallery of Ontario, gift of the Estate of Marcella Brenner Louis, 2010.

HOW TO TAKE PART

Watch the livestream (link below) on Wednesday, February 3, 7pm – 8:30pm EST.

Follow @agotoronto and the hashtag #NewLookAGO on Twitter for our livetweet of key remarks.

Tweet your questions to @agotoronto (adding the hashtag #NewLookAGO) and we’ll share as many as we can with Kenneth.

OR 

Post your questions in the Livestream chat feed.

pollock

Jackson Pollock painting in his studio on Long Island, New York, 1950. Photo: © Hans Namuth

Curator’s Talk: After Abstract Expressionism: Making Sense of Painting in the 1960s

Everyone was at a loss after Abstract Expressionist painter Jackson Pollock (1912–56) famously flung and dripped paint onto the unstretched canvases he placed on the floor of his studio in 1948. To quote the American artist Allan Kaprow: “he destroyed painting.” If Pollock destroyed all the assumptions everyone had about painting in the late 1940s, he also created a generation of artists who were forced to contend with his innovation in the 1950s and 1960s. we will explore how artists made sense of painting in the wake of Jackson Pollock’s radical gesture.

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