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Memories of King Tut: Nieces and Nephews

August 6th, 2009

tut-memories1

Archival image from AGO, Treasures of Tutankhamun, 1979. Visitor’s looking at the “Leopard Skin Stool”.
© 2009 Art Gallery of Ontario

The AGO is preparing to welcome King Tut: The Golden King and the Great Pharaohs for its exclusive Canadian appearance starting Nov. 24, 2009 (starting Nov. 21 if you’re an AGO member). So we’re inviting AGO members and friends everywhere to share their memories of the 1979 King Tut exhibition – please share your memories in the Comments below.

I just read that everybody’s favourite pharaoh is returning to the AGO and my daughter and I, Egyptophiles both, are just floating with excitement!

While I have delayed buying a membership, Tut with Benefits is the perfect incentive for us. I look forward to taking my nieces and nephews to see the wonders and be amazed just as I was as a child and then again in 1979.

When my daughter was ten, my friend and I completely redecorated her bedroom in “Egyptian Princess” style, complete with gold, lapis and carnelian canopy bed, trompe l’oeil walls and reproduction artifacts.

Congratulations to all of you for this great coup!

Best regards.

How old were you when you visited the exhibition? What did you learn about the boy king and ancient Egypt? What amazed you? And in your view, what makes the wonders of ancient Egypt so alluring today? We’ll all find out come this fall when King Tut: The Golden King and the Great Pharaohs opens, featuring an almost entirely different selection of treasures and more than twice the number of artifacts as were displayed in the 1979 exhibition. Because this time, Tut is bringing his fellow pharaohs.

You will see more than 100 remarkable pieces from the tomb of King Tut and ancient sites representing some of the most important rulers throughout 2,000 years of ancient Egyptian history. While we all wait for their story, share yours today!

90 Responses to “Memories of King Tut: Nieces and Nephews”

  1. Mom and Dad took my sister and I to the first Tut show. I was eight and don’t really remember it, but when I asked my mom, she said she did. Why? Because we were touring the exhibition just behind the remarkable CBC radio announcer Barbara Frum. I hope to be trailing Rick Mercer or George Strombo this time around.

  2. Mom and Dad took my sister and I to the first Tut show. I was eight and don’t really remember it, but when I asked my mom, she said she did. Why? Because we were touring the exhibition just behind the remarkable CBC radio announcer Barbara Frum. I hope to be trailing Rick Mercer or George Strombo this time around.

  3. I was at the 1979 King Tut exhibition with my wife and my parents.

    I was astounded of course by the mask but even more so by what the doctors and embalmers did to preserve the young king…

    I have since become an active member at AGO and encourage all friends and family members to see this and many other wonders present at AGO.

    See you November 21st

    Robert Laporte

  4. I was at the 1979 King Tut exhibition with my wife and my parents.

    I was astounded of course by the mask but even more so by what the doctors and embalmers did to preserve the young king…

    I have since become an active member at AGO and encourage all friends and family members to see this and many other wonders present at AGO.

    See you November 21st

    Robert Laporte

  5. Lloyd Walton says:

    The 1979 Toronto King Tut Exhibition closed on New Years Eve. I was among the last straggling visitors to see it just before midnight.. Indeed, I was the very last person left in the hall. Alone I approached Ptah, the patron deity of artists and craftsmen. We had a silent and very powerful communion.

    1980 signaled my return to making films and painting out of my gut urges. A new confidence had come over me. Dozens of awards followed. The artist in me was given a, “Go.”

  6. Lloyd Walton says:

    The 1979 Toronto King Tut Exhibition closed on New Years Eve. I was among the last straggling visitors to see it just before midnight.. Indeed, I was the very last person left in the hall. Alone I approached Ptah, the patron deity of artists and craftsmen. We had a silent and very powerful communion.

    1980 signaled my return to making films and painting out of my gut urges. A new confidence had come over me. Dozens of awards followed. The artist in me was given a, “Go.”

  7. Marci Segal says:

    Thanks for bringing Tut back to TO.

    In ’79 I was president of the Anthropology Forum, a student group of anthropology majors at Buffalo State College, and a member of the AGO. I was living in Buffalo to study at their International Center for Studies in Creativity. Anthropology was my major, creative studies, a minor.

    Moved by the Tut opportunity, I cajoled the powers-that-were to make tickets and transport available for students and faculty for the trek. Well worthwhile. Felt good to provide an open door to culture and learning, networking and fun. We followed it up with a party where each dressed as a figure from Tut’s time. Without the Tut exhibit, Ancient Egypt 301 might have not had the impact it did.

    Looking forward to Tut ’09, this time to bring clients to help stimulate their creative thinking as we enter the age of innovation.

  8. Marci Segal says:

    Thanks for bringing Tut back to TO.

    In ’79 I was president of the Anthropology Forum, a student group of anthropology majors at Buffalo State College, and a member of the AGO. I was living in Buffalo to study at their International Center for Studies in Creativity. Anthropology was my major, creative studies, a minor.

    Moved by the Tut opportunity, I cajoled the powers-that-were to make tickets and transport available for students and faculty for the trek. Well worthwhile. Felt good to provide an open door to culture and learning, networking and fun. We followed it up with a party where each dressed as a figure from Tut’s time. Without the Tut exhibit, Ancient Egypt 301 might have not had the impact it did.

    Looking forward to Tut ’09, this time to bring clients to help stimulate their creative thinking as we enter the age of innovation.

  9. Johanne Frechette says:

    I was in Grade 12 and went with my high school. I thought that the exhibits were very cool. It was the first time i ever saw a mummy. Can;t wait to go to this one im taking my 12 year old as we went to the ROM this summer and she enjoyed the egyptian stuff there.

  10. Johanne Frechette says:

    I was in Grade 12 and went with my high school. I thought that the exhibits were very cool. It was the first time i ever saw a mummy. Can;t wait to go to this one im taking my 12 year old as we went to the ROM this summer and she enjoyed the egyptian stuff there.

  11. Roy Shantz says:

    I was 19 and in my second year at university when I went through the Tut exhibition with my parents, sister, two aunts and one uncle. While I do not have detailed memories of the show itself, I did purchase an exhibition poster. There certainly was some inspiration in that poster as Tut’s mask still peers at me from the wall of my high school classroom where I teach history.

    This time I hope to bring my wife and two children (age 14 and 11) to the exhibit. If the show doesn’t inspire my boys, perhaps a gift shop purchase will have a more lasting impression!

  12. Roy Shantz says:

    I was 19 and in my second year at university when I went through the Tut exhibition with my parents, sister, two aunts and one uncle. While I do not have detailed memories of the show itself, I did purchase an exhibition poster. There certainly was some inspiration in that poster as Tut’s mask still peers at me from the wall of my high school classroom where I teach history.

    This time I hope to bring my wife and two children (age 14 and 11) to the exhibit. If the show doesn’t inspire my boys, perhaps a gift shop purchase will have a more lasting impression!

  13. Elaine Carmichael says:

    I was 11 years old back in 1979. 5 other kids and I won an essay writing contest about King Tut, and the prize was a trip to see the exhibit. At the time, I was absolutely terrified to even glance at King Tut’s death mask, because I had read up on “the curses”. I thought, oh my gosh, King Tut will so know if I am looking at his mask, and I will be cursed! 😛 I’m 40 years old now, and not much has changed with my active imagination 😛

  14. Elaine Carmichael says:

    I was 11 years old back in 1979. 5 other kids and I won an essay writing contest about King Tut, and the prize was a trip to see the exhibit. At the time, I was absolutely terrified to even glance at King Tut’s death mask, because I had read up on “the curses”. I thought, oh my gosh, King Tut will so know if I am looking at his mask, and I will be cursed! 😛 I’m 40 years old now, and not much has changed with my active imagination 😛

  15. S. Davidson says:

    I was really thrilled to hear that this exhibit is returning to Toronto. I can recall being very young and hearing of the amazing stories surrounding King Tut. The curses that were placed on those who had disturbed his resting spot and the elaborate burial as well as the stories of his servants who were buried with him. I now have a boy who is 9 yrs old and he’s fascinated with the stories. We cannot wait for it the exhibit and the myths that surround this amazing pharoah.

  16. S. Davidson says:

    I was really thrilled to hear that this exhibit is returning to Toronto. I can recall being very young and hearing of the amazing stories surrounding King Tut. The curses that were placed on those who had disturbed his resting spot and the elaborate burial as well as the stories of his servants who were buried with him. I now have a boy who is 9 yrs old and he’s fascinated with the stories. We cannot wait for it the exhibit and the myths that surround this amazing pharoah.

  17. […] by the by, the treasures of King Tut are coming to the AGO in November – plan to get your tickets […]

  18. S. Robertson says:

    In ’79 I went through the King Tut exhibit twice. My favorite were all the animated bottles and golden trinkets that accompanied the body in burial. I was absolutely fascinated by the meticulous embalming process, too. The second visit was to Seattle. My mother drove us over the border early on a Monday morning, unaware that it was an American holiday. We spent 9 hours waiting in line just to get tickets into the exhibition. We had just enough time to find something hot for dinner and return for our 9pm entry time. I will never forget the good humour and kindness of those waiting with us in line covered in sleeping bags to keep warm. And yes, the exhibit was worth it.

  19. S. Robertson says:

    In ’79 I went through the King Tut exhibit twice. My favorite were all the animated bottles and golden trinkets that accompanied the body in burial. I was absolutely fascinated by the meticulous embalming process, too. The second visit was to Seattle. My mother drove us over the border early on a Monday morning, unaware that it was an American holiday. We spent 9 hours waiting in line just to get tickets into the exhibition. We had just enough time to find something hot for dinner and return for our 9pm entry time. I will never forget the good humour and kindness of those waiting with us in line covered in sleeping bags to keep warm. And yes, the exhibit was worth it.

  20. Susan Boyle says:

    I saw the King Tut exhibition back in 1979…I was 7 years old. To be frank, I can’t recall much about it other than my mother buying me a TUT hat and eating a candied apple from a vendor outside the AGO…..oh yes…and a really long line up. I think I must’ve had a good time but it was what happend after the exhibition that I remember most….I was tormented with nightmares of mummies chasing me and my mother in the park (we used to hang out around the swing sets quite often). I was so scared that I had to sleep in my parents bed everynight for weeks. But…thankfully …one Saturday morning I saw a Scooby Doo episode where Scooby solves the “Mummy Mystery” and when he unwrapped the evil mummy I saw it was just a dude. So I thought to myself I guess mummies are just dead dudes and nothing to be afraid of….

    I can’t wait for the new King Tut exhibition but I hope I don’t get those nightmares again and I sure hope I don’t have to crawl into my parents bed again every night for safety….I don’t think they’d appreciate it at 37 years old.

  21. Susan Boyle says:

    I saw the King Tut exhibition back in 1979…I was 7 years old. To be frank, I can’t recall much about it other than my mother buying me a TUT hat and eating a candied apple from a vendor outside the AGO…..oh yes…and a really long line up. I think I must’ve had a good time but it was what happend after the exhibition that I remember most….I was tormented with nightmares of mummies chasing me and my mother in the park (we used to hang out around the swing sets quite often). I was so scared that I had to sleep in my parents bed everynight for weeks. But…thankfully …one Saturday morning I saw a Scooby Doo episode where Scooby solves the “Mummy Mystery” and when he unwrapped the evil mummy I saw it was just a dude. So I thought to myself I guess mummies are just dead dudes and nothing to be afraid of….

    I can’t wait for the new King Tut exhibition but I hope I don’t get those nightmares again and I sure hope I don’t have to crawl into my parents bed again every night for safety….I don’t think they’d appreciate it at 37 years old.

  22. Mary-Ethel Bradley says:

    I was an AGO member volunteer for the 1979 Tut exhibition. Many
    people from the U.S. called asking for directions to the Gallery, dates, times, tickets. I enjoyed Tut more for having worked so hard on the phones.Such beautiful objects and workmanship :could
    never figure out the headrests :still can’t. How could they have slept on such tiny stool-like head supports ? At the time Ralph Lauren had just brought out his new perfume (red bottle) and the AGO Gift Shop was selling a silk scarf (Egyptian Terra cotta colours). I associate that exhibition with that scent and silken colours. So happy Tut has returned : have re-newed my membership and will see him again in September.Thank-you so much AGO.

  23. Mary-Ethel Bradley says:

    I was an AGO member volunteer for the 1979 Tut exhibition. Many
    people from the U.S. called asking for directions to the Gallery, dates, times, tickets. I enjoyed Tut more for having worked so hard on the phones.Such beautiful objects and workmanship :could
    never figure out the headrests :still can’t. How could they have slept on such tiny stool-like head supports ? At the time Ralph Lauren had just brought out his new perfume (red bottle) and the AGO Gift Shop was selling a silk scarf (Egyptian Terra cotta colours). I associate that exhibition with that scent and silken colours. So happy Tut has returned : have re-newed my membership and will see him again in September.Thank-you so much AGO.

  24. David A.W. Delcloo says:

    I was in Grade 6 living in the Laurentians when my folks took me to see the Boy King in 1979. I do not recall too much about the train trip to Toronto from Montreal, but I do remember all the GOLD…. Also, the brilliant siamese cat figures and symbols.

    I was taken so much, I did a presentation to my class upon return and got an A+ for my project.

    I look forward to taking my children this year. I will join asap.

    THANK YOU AGO.

  25. David A.W. Delcloo says:

    I was in Grade 6 living in the Laurentians when my folks took me to see the Boy King in 1979. I do not recall too much about the train trip to Toronto from Montreal, but I do remember all the GOLD…. Also, the brilliant siamese cat figures and symbols.

    I was taken so much, I did a presentation to my class upon return and got an A+ for my project.

    I look forward to taking my children this year. I will join asap.

    THANK YOU AGO.

  26. Sara W. says:

    “Do you remember the time?” (Michael Jackson’s Egypt-themed video) Yes! I was 9, I was in Grade 4, and I remember A) the way the AGO front foyer used to look B) the big crowds and C) the big crowds around the showpiece blue/gold mask which was in Display Case #25. The other big memory for me was the class project we all had to put on for an after-hours open class in the school library for our parents and it was about ancient Egypt because of the exhibit. One kid in our class played the part of the mummified King Tut – he was wrapped in bathroom tissue (no I’m not making this up).

  27. Sara W. says:

    “Do you remember the time?” (Michael Jackson’s Egypt-themed video) Yes! I was 9, I was in Grade 4, and I remember A) the way the AGO front foyer used to look B) the big crowds and C) the big crowds around the showpiece blue/gold mask which was in Display Case #25. The other big memory for me was the class project we all had to put on for an after-hours open class in the school library for our parents and it was about ancient Egypt because of the exhibit. One kid in our class played the part of the mummified King Tut – he was wrapped in bathroom tissue (no I’m not making this up).

  28. Jennifer Ferro says:

    I was very lucky to see the exhibit in 1979. We had group tickets organized through my high school in Mississauga, Ontario. Our King Tut field trip was scheduled during the week that we were evacuated due to the chemical spill from the Mississauga Train Derailment. I was staying with family in Toronto and made my way to the exhibit without my ticket. A few other classmates also made their way to Toronto without their tickets and after explaining our situation to the staff, we were permitted entrance.

    I remember gold, gold and more gold. Although I was only 14 years old, I appreciated the opportunity to attend the exhibit.

    Now I’ll be able to attend once more, this time with my 17 year old son who is fascinated and passionate about Egyptology.

    Thank you.

  29. Jennifer Ferro says:

    I was very lucky to see the exhibit in 1979. We had group tickets organized through my high school in Mississauga, Ontario. Our King Tut field trip was scheduled during the week that we were evacuated due to the chemical spill from the Mississauga Train Derailment. I was staying with family in Toronto and made my way to the exhibit without my ticket. A few other classmates also made their way to Toronto without their tickets and after explaining our situation to the staff, we were permitted entrance.

    I remember gold, gold and more gold. Although I was only 14 years old, I appreciated the opportunity to attend the exhibit.

    Now I’ll be able to attend once more, this time with my 17 year old son who is fascinated and passionate about Egyptology.

    Thank you.

  30. Marian Gerson says:

    I remember the 1979 Tut exhibit well since I was a young mother at the time. Therefore, our visit to see the exhibit included bringing along our infant son in a pouch. He was about 4 or 5 months old. The crowds were phenomenal… everywhere were people desperate to see the gold artifacts left behind in memory of the boy king. We all had to wait for closeup looks. Through it all, our son slept on. Many visitors were interested as well in the sleeping baby we carried about. He gained his own notoriety snoozing away in the midst of the dazzling exhibit. This fall, we are going to return and bring him along again. He’s now 30 and I expect will be able to stay awake and see some of what he missed the first time round. He has been asking who will carry him this time.

  31. Marian Gerson says:

    I remember the 1979 Tut exhibit well since I was a young mother at the time. Therefore, our visit to see the exhibit included bringing along our infant son in a pouch. He was about 4 or 5 months old. The crowds were phenomenal… everywhere were people desperate to see the gold artifacts left behind in memory of the boy king. We all had to wait for closeup looks. Through it all, our son slept on. Many visitors were interested as well in the sleeping baby we carried about. He gained his own notoriety snoozing away in the midst of the dazzling exhibit. This fall, we are going to return and bring him along again. He’s now 30 and I expect will be able to stay awake and see some of what he missed the first time round. He has been asking who will carry him this time.

  32. My second cousin Maureen shared a memory with me and said I could post it. She was a teenager and went with her mom and dad from Burlington. It was the day after that the train crashed and most of Mississauga was evacuated for three weeks. She remembers they got up mighty early to take a detour to the gallery – but they didn’t miss it!

  33. My second cousin Maureen shared a memory with me and said I could post it. She was a teenager and went with her mom and dad from Burlington. It was the day after that the train crashed and most of Mississauga was evacuated for three weeks. She remembers they got up mighty early to take a detour to the gallery – but they didn’t miss it!

  34. Andrew Graham says:

    I was 12 years old when Tut was here the last time. By that time I had already made the decision to become an archaeologist. 30 years later – here I am, an archaeologist who has worked in the Middle East, toured around the Med., visited Egypt and am teaching Intro to Western Civilization at UofT. How great is that! I am so looking forward to taking my daughter (same age was) to the exhibit and have her experience the same feelings I did. Who knows, maybe she’ll want to follow in her fathers footsteps!

  35. Andrew Graham says:

    I was 12 years old when Tut was here the last time. By that time I had already made the decision to become an archaeologist. 30 years later – here I am, an archaeologist who has worked in the Middle East, toured around the Med., visited Egypt and am teaching Intro to Western Civilization at UofT. How great is that! I am so looking forward to taking my daughter (same age was) to the exhibit and have her experience the same feelings I did. Who knows, maybe she’ll want to follow in her fathers footsteps!

  36. A. Moreira says:

    I was just telling my 13 y/o son yesterday that I had seen this exhibit as a little girl (10 y/o) during a school trip and can’t wait to take him to see it…happy to see it’s back

  37. A. Moreira says:

    I was just telling my 13 y/o son yesterday that I had seen this exhibit as a little girl (10 y/o) during a school trip and can’t wait to take him to see it…happy to see it’s back

  38. J. Foster says:

    I saw this exhibit when I was 9 years old. I was completely fascinated by hieroglyphics, and bought a kit in the giftstore that showed how to draw them. I remember sending notes to my family, and also doing a school project, written entirely in hieroglyphics. (I still have the kit, along with the book from the exhibit.) The other thing that I remember from the exhibit was the fact that King Tut wore earrings. When I was entering my teens, and the punk rock movement was new, I heard adults criticizing youth who wore earrings, and thought I had an indefensible arguement when I remembered that King Tut wore them, too.

  39. J. Foster says:

    I saw this exhibit when I was 9 years old. I was completely fascinated by hieroglyphics, and bought a kit in the giftstore that showed how to draw them. I remember sending notes to my family, and also doing a school project, written entirely in hieroglyphics. (I still have the kit, along with the book from the exhibit.) The other thing that I remember from the exhibit was the fact that King Tut wore earrings. When I was entering my teens, and the punk rock movement was new, I heard adults criticizing youth who wore earrings, and thought I had an indefensible arguement when I remembered that King Tut wore them, too.

  40. Sandra Ka says:

    I became fascinated with Tutankhamun with the approach of the 1979 exhibit and the exhibit itself blew me away. I still have my ticket and the original bag from the museum shop “The Tutankhamun Shop” where I loaded up on Tut goodies, the original flyer, brochure and articles from Readers Digest, Chatelaine, Toronto Calendar Magazine and the Toronto Star. I am beyond excited that the golden pharaoh is returning to our city.
    If anyone at the AGO would like PDF copies of the materials that I have collected from the 1970 exhibit, please feel free to contact me.

  41. Sandra Ka says:

    I became fascinated with Tutankhamun with the approach of the 1979 exhibit and the exhibit itself blew me away. I still have my ticket and the original bag from the museum shop “The Tutankhamun Shop” where I loaded up on Tut goodies, the original flyer, brochure and articles from Readers Digest, Chatelaine, Toronto Calendar Magazine and the Toronto Star. I am beyond excited that the golden pharaoh is returning to our city.
    If anyone at the AGO would like PDF copies of the materials that I have collected from the 1970 exhibit, please feel free to contact me.

  42. Lenore R says:

    I was 29 when I saw this amazing exhibit. Everything, but everything, was so interesting. The richness of this exhibit was profound and just to be able to see the craftsmanship of that time was unbelievable. It may be odd to say this; but, I thought those alabaster lamps were such a invention (dispite their simplicity in design). I loved this exhibit! It was like be present in that moment of time.

  43. Lenore R says:

    I was 29 when I saw this amazing exhibit. Everything, but everything, was so interesting. The richness of this exhibit was profound and just to be able to see the craftsmanship of that time was unbelievable. It may be odd to say this; but, I thought those alabaster lamps were such a invention (dispite their simplicity in design). I loved this exhibit! It was like be present in that moment of time.

  44. Christine Solosky says:

    I bought an AGO membership when I was 21-years-old in 1978. Soon afterwords, I was able to take in the King Tut Exhibition for free! As a teenager, I was fascinated by Ancient Egypt and wanted to become an archeologist. Being able to see this magnificent glittering pageant was a wonderful experience! Since the exhibit has returned, I am now able to revisit it with my thirteen-year-old homeschooled daughter in what will be a history field trip!

  45. Christine Solosky says:

    I bought an AGO membership when I was 21-years-old in 1978. Soon afterwords, I was able to take in the King Tut Exhibition for free! As a teenager, I was fascinated by Ancient Egypt and wanted to become an archeologist. Being able to see this magnificent glittering pageant was a wonderful experience! Since the exhibit has returned, I am now able to revisit it with my thirteen-year-old homeschooled daughter in what will be a history field trip!

  46. Sherry B says:

    I have been reading all of the comments from “Tut” exhibit circa 1979. I was a twelve year old, who along with my best friend won an essay competition within our school. Our compostitions were choosen at our middle school in south Etobicoke, and the prize was a ticket to the very famous exhibit. We were thrilled, just the thought of seeing these artifacts in person rather than in a book was just amazing to us. As someone mentioned, I do remember the “dark” entrance, and especially the death mask. I was not afraid of seeing the supposed evil cursed mask, I was trying to figure out how it was made. The whole experience is still etched in my mind, I believe it was the main factor in my love for history to this day. My best friend and I plan on getting tickets this time around if possible, to relive our exciting trip from 30yrs ago. I know we will both take more away this time , we often talked about the 1979 exhibit, and how we hoped it would return someday. Thanks AGO, looking forward to attending this falls exhibit….SB

  47. Sherry B says:

    I have been reading all of the comments from “Tut” exhibit circa 1979. I was a twelve year old, who along with my best friend won an essay competition within our school. Our compostitions were choosen at our middle school in south Etobicoke, and the prize was a ticket to the very famous exhibit. We were thrilled, just the thought of seeing these artifacts in person rather than in a book was just amazing to us. As someone mentioned, I do remember the “dark” entrance, and especially the death mask. I was not afraid of seeing the supposed evil cursed mask, I was trying to figure out how it was made. The whole experience is still etched in my mind, I believe it was the main factor in my love for history to this day. My best friend and I plan on getting tickets this time around if possible, to relive our exciting trip from 30yrs ago. I know we will both take more away this time , we often talked about the 1979 exhibit, and how we hoped it would return someday. Thanks AGO, looking forward to attending this falls exhibit….SB

  48. Michelle says:

    My mother and a friend attended the Tutankhaum exhibit in 1979. I was only 6 years old at the time but I remember the book my mom brought home from the show called “Tutankhaum: his Tomb and its treasures”. I would spend hours flipping through the book with my mom looking at all the beautiful treasures. I now share that same book with my own children, ages 4 and 6, who are equally fascinated by the story and treasures of Tutankhaum. I can’t wait to share with them this great experience — King “tut” at the AGO 2009.

  49. Michelle says:

    My mother and a friend attended the Tutankhaum exhibit in 1979. I was only 6 years old at the time but I remember the book my mom brought home from the show called “Tutankhaum: his Tomb and its treasures”. I would spend hours flipping through the book with my mom looking at all the beautiful treasures. I now share that same book with my own children, ages 4 and 6, who are equally fascinated by the story and treasures of Tutankhaum. I can’t wait to share with them this great experience — King “tut” at the AGO 2009.

  50. Rita Cacciotti - Attard says:

    I was honoured to be chosen one of he Ushabtis for the 1979 viewing of the Treasures of King Tutankhamun. I am excited to see that some of the pieces are returning and will enjoy taking my children to see them

  51. Rita Cacciotti - Attard says:

    I was honoured to be chosen one of he Ushabtis for the 1979 viewing of the Treasures of King Tutankhamun. I am excited to see that some of the pieces are returning and will enjoy taking my children to see them

  52. Eya Kotulsky says:

    In 1979, Ivaan Kotulsky, a brilliant Toronto metal artist and jeweller, created an incredibly beautiful collection of jewellery inspired by Tutankhamun. His work, including scarab rings and other exquisite pieces, was sold at the AGO Gift Shop, and its remarkable beauty has stood the test of time (as has everything related to King Tut!). For thirty years, he kept his ticket to the exhibit in mint condition inside the back cover of his art journal My beloved husband Ivaan’s death last December, which tragically cut short a brilliant and productive life in metal arts, means that he will not be able to see this exhibit in person, but his 1979 Tutankhamun jewellery will be there on display. Don’t miss the opportunity, when you are attending this year’s exhibit, to stop by the AGO shop and see the display of Ivaan’s jewellery. I wonder if the piece of scarab jewellery purchased by Fiona, whose comment appears above, is an Ivaan piece. If so, she owns a real treasure.

  53. Eya Kotulsky says:

    In 1979, Ivaan Kotulsky, a brilliant Toronto metal artist and jeweller, created an incredibly beautiful collection of jewellery inspired by Tutankhamun. His work, including scarab rings and other exquisite pieces, was sold at the AGO Gift Shop, and its remarkable beauty has stood the test of time (as has everything related to King Tut!). For thirty years, he kept his ticket to the exhibit in mint condition inside the back cover of his art journal My beloved husband Ivaan’s death last December, which tragically cut short a brilliant and productive life in metal arts, means that he will not be able to see this exhibit in person, but his 1979 Tutankhamun jewellery will be there on display. Don’t miss the opportunity, when you are attending this year’s exhibit, to stop by the AGO shop and see the display of Ivaan’s jewellery. I wonder if the piece of scarab jewellery purchased by Fiona, whose comment appears above, is an Ivaan piece. If so, she owns a real treasure.

  54. danielle says:

    that lady looks parilized

  55. danielle says:

    that lady looks parilized

  56. Before my husband & i had met we both viewed King Tuts treasures. In 1979 we were 17 years old. My parents who grew up very poor always tried to treat us to wonderful experiences that they could only dream of as childern.Mom booked the train out of London (we lived on a farm)along with a room at the historic Royal York. My younger brother & i still appreciate that trip..it was a visual & educational feast. This Christmas we will gift a trip to see Tut once again with our 27yr.old son,his wife,our 17 yr.old daughter,& her boyfriend.Hopefully my parents now 74 will join us… My treat

  57. michelle walker says:

    wow, I just bought tickets to take my kids to see the King.
    I was 9 when i first saw him, and I still have the button my mom bought me:)
    I’m so excited about this, a must see..
    I remember in class we were doing all sorts of egyptian things, and i still ahve a piece i made from clay, what memories.

  58. michelle walker says:

    wow, I just bought tickets to take my kids to see the King.
    I was 9 when i first saw him, and I still have the button my mom bought me:)
    I’m so excited about this, a must see..
    I remember in class we were doing all sorts of egyptian things, and i still ahve a piece i made from clay, what memories.

  59. Yves McCann says:

    I was there in 1979, we were 2 couples from Quebec City, we drove all the way to Toronto to see the exhibition. The father of my friend bought the tickets for us. What I remember the most is the golden mask, it was the thrill of a lifetime to stand in front of it and I remember also that the pieces were shown in the chronological order that they were discovered. 28 years after I went to Philadelphia with my wife and kids to see this exhibition, its a lot smaller but it was great to see some pieces again.

  60. Yves McCann says:

    I was there in 1979, we were 2 couples from Quebec City, we drove all the way to Toronto to see the exhibition. The father of my friend bought the tickets for us. What I remember the most is the golden mask, it was the thrill of a lifetime to stand in front of it and I remember also that the pieces were shown in the chronological order that they were discovered. 28 years after I went to Philadelphia with my wife and kids to see this exhibition, its a lot smaller but it was great to see some pieces again.

  61. mbc says:

    30 years ago I was going through a difficult adjustment having just moved to Toronto. I was 9 years old at the time and it was a lonely, isolating phase for me. I remember being so consumed with King Tut and ancient Egypt in the months prior to our class trip. It was the most amazing thing in my life at that time. It transported me out of a difficult childhood period into a dreamy, fantastical world of kings, pyramids and divine power. It made quite a strong impression on me and I’m excited to see it again 30 years later.

    Thanks to all who had a hand in bringing this back and for brightening the world of a 9 year old girl.

  62. mbc says:

    30 years ago I was going through a difficult adjustment having just moved to Toronto. I was 9 years old at the time and it was a lonely, isolating phase for me. I remember being so consumed with King Tut and ancient Egypt in the months prior to our class trip. It was the most amazing thing in my life at that time. It transported me out of a difficult childhood period into a dreamy, fantastical world of kings, pyramids and divine power. It made quite a strong impression on me and I’m excited to see it again 30 years later.

    Thanks to all who had a hand in bringing this back and for brightening the world of a 9 year old girl.

  63. Sarah says:

    I remember my parents taking me to see the exhibit when I was 12 years old and being absolutely fasinated by all of it. I still have my souvenir mummy pin that says “Tut Tut” from the original exhibit!
    I am anxious to take my 12 and 13 year old sons to see it this time.

  64. Sarah says:

    I remember my parents taking me to see the exhibit when I was 12 years old and being absolutely fasinated by all of it. I still have my souvenir mummy pin that says “Tut Tut” from the original exhibit!
    I am anxious to take my 12 and 13 year old sons to see it this time.

  65. jenn says:

    I was there on a school trip in 1979 – I had a blast designing a King Tut project report, pictures and all which did not do the show justice, but to this day the viewing triggered my love for art history, historical research and reading. It’s great to see that Tut has returned with even more historical artifacts. Super effort on the part of the AGO – congrats.

  66. jenn says:

    I was there on a school trip in 1979 – I had a blast designing a King Tut project report, pictures and all which did not do the show justice, but to this day the viewing triggered my love for art history, historical research and reading. It’s great to see that Tut has returned with even more historical artifacts. Super effort on the part of the AGO – congrats.

  67. Jeanne Hill Flegg says:

    I went to see the exhibit with my school. I loved it so much and will definetly be there to see it again. My girlfriend and I both bought t-shirts and they said keep your hands off my tuts..hahaha I am going to see if my 20 year old son would love to come and see it with me I hope so he loves all this stuff. Thanks for bringing it back again now a new generation gets to see all these amazing treasures. See you soon can’t wait!!!

  68. Jeanne Hill Flegg says:

    I went to see the exhibit with my school. I loved it so much and will definetly be there to see it again. My girlfriend and I both bought t-shirts and they said keep your hands off my tuts..hahaha I am going to see if my 20 year old son would love to come and see it with me I hope so he loves all this stuff. Thanks for bringing it back again now a new generation gets to see all these amazing treasures. See you soon can’t wait!!!

  69. Ruth McKeown says:

    We dressed up like members of the Tutankhamun household! I got to be Cleopatra. None of the twenty-five of us were history students, that’s for sure. Being fun-loving members of Hart House Chorus at the University of Toronto, we paraded from the campus to the AGO in great anticipation of seeing the “Treasures,” and of being seen. We were met by an Anubis-like security guard, who failed to appreciate our excitement and mirth. We finally talked him into letting us in after even offering to sing some suitably Egyptian-like song. (We would have figured something out.) What a “golden” memory of not only the fantastic show, but the fun of the occasion.

  70. Ruth McKeown says:

    We dressed up like members of the Tutankhamun household! I got to be Cleopatra. None of the twenty-five of us were history students, that’s for sure. Being fun-loving members of Hart House Chorus at the University of Toronto, we paraded from the campus to the AGO in great anticipation of seeing the “Treasures,” and of being seen. We were met by an Anubis-like security guard, who failed to appreciate our excitement and mirth. We finally talked him into letting us in after even offering to sing some suitably Egyptian-like song. (We would have figured something out.) What a “golden” memory of not only the fantastic show, but the fun of the occasion.

  71. Viviane Chaperon says:

    In 1979, you could book your “pakage deal week-end ” at the Eaton’s Travel Agency in Montreal. So my 5 friends and I took the train to Toronto and, of course, to visit the Tutankhamun’s exhibit ! We had so much fun ( we were so young at 25 !)and the exhibit was such a wonder ! I still have the ticket to the exhibit as a souvenir and 30 years later, I’m sure pleased to know that King Tut is back in town !

  72. Viviane Chaperon says:

    In 1979, you could book your “pakage deal week-end ” at the Eaton’s Travel Agency in Montreal. So my 5 friends and I took the train to Toronto and, of course, to visit the Tutankhamun’s exhibit ! We had so much fun ( we were so young at 25 !)and the exhibit was such a wonder ! I still have the ticket to the exhibit as a souvenir and 30 years later, I’m sure pleased to know that King Tut is back in town !

  73. Johanne says:

    30 years ago I was staring at the Gold Mask in AGO! A year later I went to Egypt and the Mask was still on tour ! What a luck to have seen this wounderful piece of art in Toronto !

  74. Johanne says:

    30 years ago I was staring at the Gold Mask in AGO! A year later I went to Egypt and the Mask was still on tour ! What a luck to have seen this wounderful piece of art in Toronto !

  75. Jennifer Thompson-Johnson says:

    Having been an Egyption history fan since I was in high school I was beyond ecstatic back in Grade 11 when I was chosen as one of the two students from my school to go see the King Tut exhibit in Toronto. My classmate Peter and I were entralled by everything, especially the Mask – it was more stunning in real life than in photos. But what impressed me or rather moved me the most was the gilded statue of the goddess Selket as she guarded the Pharoah’s canopic shrine. Her beautiful eyes seemed to implore not to disturb her King’s rest.

    Now 30 years later, we are planning a trip in the new year to take my 17 year old step-daughter who is also an Egyptian history fan! It will be a gift for Christmas but I don’t know who will be more excited!

    I cannot wait!

  76. Jennifer Thompson-Johnson says:

    Having been an Egyption history fan since I was in high school I was beyond ecstatic back in Grade 11 when I was chosen as one of the two students from my school to go see the King Tut exhibit in Toronto. My classmate Peter and I were entralled by everything, especially the Mask – it was more stunning in real life than in photos. But what impressed me or rather moved me the most was the gilded statue of the goddess Selket as she guarded the Pharoah’s canopic shrine. Her beautiful eyes seemed to implore not to disturb her King’s rest.

    Now 30 years later, we are planning a trip in the new year to take my 17 year old step-daughter who is also an Egyptian history fan! It will be a gift for Christmas but I don’t know who will be more excited!

    I cannot wait!

  77. Dan says:

    In 1979 I was 12 years old living in Sudbury over 4 hours north of Toronto.
    The Toronto Star had published articles about the King Tut tour, I even started a scrap book at that time about King Tut and egypt and when the Toronto star published the full page picture of King Tut golden death mask I was in my glory and it hung in my room for several years. Unfortuatly my parents did not have the resources to take me. So I visited the AGO throught articles and visited the valley of the Kings throught documentories, movies and books.

    Today is my 42nd birthday and my wife, my friend, my partner purchase two passes to go and see King Tut…

    I will be driving the 4 hours plus with my 8 year old son.

    Thank you, Art Gallery of Ontario for granting a childhood wish by bringing this exhibition back to Canada.

  78. Dan says:

    In 1979 I was 12 years old living in Sudbury over 4 hours north of Toronto.
    The Toronto Star had published articles about the King Tut tour, I even started a scrap book at that time about King Tut and egypt and when the Toronto star published the full page picture of King Tut golden death mask I was in my glory and it hung in my room for several years. Unfortuatly my parents did not have the resources to take me. So I visited the AGO throught articles and visited the valley of the Kings throught documentories, movies and books.

    Today is my 42nd birthday and my wife, my friend, my partner purchase two passes to go and see King Tut…

    I will be driving the 4 hours plus with my 8 year old son.

    Thank you, Art Gallery of Ontario for granting a childhood wish by bringing this exhibition back to Canada.

  79. Sheila says:

    I visited this exhibition with my parents and my boyfriend when I was 17. I remember being in awe over the beauty of all the displays. I was way behind everyone else going through and they had to keep coming back and telling me to catch up. I also remember that the gift shop had many beautiful items, including chocolates in the shape of the burial mask. I still have a jewelry set that I purchased there with depictions of Nefertiti on them. I’m very hopeful that I will get to see the new exhibit.

  80. Sheila says:

    I visited this exhibition with my parents and my boyfriend when I was 17. I remember being in awe over the beauty of all the displays. I was way behind everyone else going through and they had to keep coming back and telling me to catch up. I also remember that the gift shop had many beautiful items, including chocolates in the shape of the burial mask. I still have a jewelry set that I purchased there with depictions of Nefertiti on them. I’m very hopeful that I will get to see the new exhibit.

  81. Substantially the most significant event in my life. I was 14 and I took the train from St. Catharines to Toronto on my own to see the exhibit. I was seriously an Egyptology addict. I was determined to decipher the Hieroglyphs alone. I brought my sketch pad and my “Egyptian Book of the Dead”. With it I intended on locating the hieroglyphs and figuring out what the inscriptions said for myself. I didn’t want to rely on the translations provided.

    As I sat there in front of the animal skin piece on the pole, copying the hieroglyphs meticulously into my sketch pad a gentleman came and sat down beside me. He asked me what I was doing and when I replied and explained, he pointed to the symbols and explained what each one was and it’s significance to the others – their relationship and thus the meaning of the inscription.

    I was stunned and in awe of this man who knew all of this off the top of his head. I wanted to be like him, I wanted to be able to read the hieroglyphics more than anything else in the world. He then introduced himself to me as the professor of Egyptology at the U of T. I wanted him to adopt me right then and there. He did the next best thing. He arranged for me to get a copy of the text book they used at the university “Gardiner’s Egyptian Grammar”. We stayed in contact for a little while after I returned home, but lost contact over time.

    Unfortunately as the good book says, “Time and unforeseen circumstances befall us all” and so they did in my life also. Family challenges, health and situations did not allow my passion and goals to be achieved and come to fruition. However, I still remain passionate, and cherish the book and the memories. Whenever I’m able to allow myself the luxury of revisiting them I take out the book and my sketch pad and work through the lessons on my own. In my dreams I’m an Egyptology and Hieroglyphic linguist.

    Thank you for bringing my memories back to life.

  82. Substantially the most significant event in my life. I was 14 and I took the train from St. Catharines to Toronto on my own to see the exhibit. I was seriously an Egyptology addict. I was determined to decipher the Hieroglyphs alone. I brought my sketch pad and my “Egyptian Book of the Dead”. With it I intended on locating the hieroglyphs and figuring out what the inscriptions said for myself. I didn’t want to rely on the translations provided.

    As I sat there in front of the animal skin piece on the pole, copying the hieroglyphs meticulously into my sketch pad a gentleman came and sat down beside me. He asked me what I was doing and when I replied and explained, he pointed to the symbols and explained what each one was and it’s significance to the others – their relationship and thus the meaning of the inscription.

    I was stunned and in awe of this man who knew all of this off the top of his head. I wanted to be like him, I wanted to be able to read the hieroglyphics more than anything else in the world. He then introduced himself to me as the professor of Egyptology at the U of T. I wanted him to adopt me right then and there. He did the next best thing. He arranged for me to get a copy of the text book they used at the university “Gardiner’s Egyptian Grammar”. We stayed in contact for a little while after I returned home, but lost contact over time.

    Unfortunately as the good book says, “Time and unforeseen circumstances befall us all” and so they did in my life also. Family challenges, health and situations did not allow my passion and goals to be achieved and come to fruition. However, I still remain passionate, and cherish the book and the memories. Whenever I’m able to allow myself the luxury of revisiting them I take out the book and my sketch pad and work through the lessons on my own. In my dreams I’m an Egyptology and Hieroglyphic linguist.

    Thank you for bringing my memories back to life.

  83. Susan MacDonald says:

    I visited the King Tut exhibit when it was in Toronto in 1979. I was 11 years old and had been picked in my class to be part of the field trip downtown. I remember being so excitied that morning that I was up and ready by 5:30 A.M. I remember being in awe of the exhibit. I pictured in my mind the people who had made all that was before me in downtown Toronto; years and worlds away from Egypt. I too was worried about the Curse of Tutankhamun and wondered if I should fully gaze at all before me. I couldn’t help myself. I remember thinking how few people had seen these objects and how special it was to be there. I now live in PEI and I doubt that I will be able to get to Toronto to see it again but who knows stranger things have happened.

  84. Susan MacDonald says:

    I visited the King Tut exhibit when it was in Toronto in 1979. I was 11 years old and had been picked in my class to be part of the field trip downtown. I remember being so excitied that morning that I was up and ready by 5:30 A.M. I remember being in awe of the exhibit. I pictured in my mind the people who had made all that was before me in downtown Toronto; years and worlds away from Egypt. I too was worried about the Curse of Tutankhamun and wondered if I should fully gaze at all before me. I couldn’t help myself. I remember thinking how few people had seen these objects and how special it was to be there. I now live in PEI and I doubt that I will be able to get to Toronto to see it again but who knows stranger things have happened.

  85. Frank Dos Santos says:

    I was at the exhibit 30 years ago when I was only 8 and I still remember it vividly. So now I am bringing my 3 children to see it so they can have a memory that will last a lifetime.

  86. Frank Dos Santos says:

    I was at the exhibit 30 years ago when I was only 8 and I still remember it vividly. So now I am bringing my 3 children to see it so they can have a memory that will last a lifetime.

  87. George Countryman says:

    The over all experience of visiting this exhibit was very poor.

    The exhibits themselves are excellent but the staging of the exhibit and the flow of traffic was atrocious.

    Right from the start it is ill conceived. 50 or so attendees crammed together listening to a superfluous video preamble by Harrison Ford simply served to create a bottle neck wave of jostling viewers and created an atmosphere akin to P. T. Barnum’s museum of oddities.

    Allowing children under the age of 10 in also created an atmosphere of a side show. There is nothing in the exhibit that can appeal to a babe in arms and their fussing and screeching destroys the experience for everyone else.

    I know institutions like the AGO feel the pressure to be all inclusive but to do so at the expense of the rest of the paying attendees is just foolish.

    The Dead Sea Scroll exhibit at the ROM was far far better organized than this mess at the AGO.

    All in all this exhibit’s content was excellent but the AGO simply botched the execution totally.

  88. George Countryman says:

    The over all experience of visiting this exhibit was very poor.

    The exhibits themselves are excellent but the staging of the exhibit and the flow of traffic was atrocious.

    Right from the start it is ill conceived. 50 or so attendees crammed together listening to a superfluous video preamble by Harrison Ford simply served to create a bottle neck wave of jostling viewers and created an atmosphere akin to P. T. Barnum’s museum of oddities.

    Allowing children under the age of 10 in also created an atmosphere of a side show. There is nothing in the exhibit that can appeal to a babe in arms and their fussing and screeching destroys the experience for everyone else.

    I know institutions like the AGO feel the pressure to be all inclusive but to do so at the expense of the rest of the paying attendees is just foolish.

    The Dead Sea Scroll exhibit at the ROM was far far better organized than this mess at the AGO.

    All in all this exhibit’s content was excellent but the AGO simply botched the execution totally.

  89. Jeff Hilborn says:

    I was 16 when my parents, brothers and sister went to see King Tut at the AGO. I was blown away by the experience. The quality of the workmanship of the items on display was an eye-opener for me as I never expected to see such art from a society from so long ago. It opened my eyes to history & art and I’ve loved it ever since.

  90. Jeff Hilborn says:

    I was 16 when my parents, brothers and sister went to see King Tut at the AGO. I was blown away by the experience. The quality of the workmanship of the items on display was an eye-opener for me as I never expected to see such art from a society from so long ago. It opened my eyes to history & art and I’ve loved it ever since.

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